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Ignatian Interfaith Ministry

If you are interested in interfaith dialogue to promote greater understanding of other faith traditions and how we can collaborate with other faith communities, please join us!

May 1st Cocktail Reception for Your Parish, Your Home

Your Parish, Your Home: The Campaign for the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola

“I was a stranger and you welcomed me.” – Matthew 23:35

At the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, we warmly welcome those who seek to be a part of a vibrant worshipping community, to grow in faith, to be nurtured in mind and spirit, and to be joyful disciples of Jesus Christ in today’s world. For more than 150 years as a Jesuit parish, we have followed the Ignatian Way of prayer, community, and service.

We offer more than 20 opportunities to attend Mass each week. We reach out to the sick, we comfort those who mourn. We participate in varied forms of ministry, including prayer groups, retreats, and social justice initiatives.

We are always open to where God is calling us.

But our magnificent church buildings don’t reflect the welcome we extend to everyone.

YOU can help change that by making a gift to this important capital campaign.

Below is the work we are eager to accomplish. With these additions, upgrades, and repairs, we will continue to grow our parish, build our community, and fulfill our mission.

Help us share the abundant gifts of our parish with all those who come to our door.

To contribute to the Your Parish, Your Home: Campaign for the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, click here.

For information on making a gift of securities:
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Stock Donation Information
- Delivery of Securities Certificates


Projects:
Elevator connecting Wallace Hall with the Sanctuary: $2,000,000
Repairs to the Church Roof and Masonry: $1,350,000
Fire Detection Systems for Church, Wallace Hall, Parish House: $750,000
Handicap Access Ramps for Parish House, Grammar School: $450,000
Security Systems: $400,000
HVAC/Flue Repairs: $375,000
Fire Suppression Systems for Wallace Hall, Parish House: $350,000
Wallace Hall Entrance Renovations (Ceiling repair, lighting): $225,000
Design Fees: $600,000
Renew + Rebuild Campaign, New York Archdiocese: $1,000,000

Total Campaign Goal: $7,500,000

April 12th Your Parish, Your Home RSVP Page

LGBT Catholics and Friends

LGBT Catholics and Friends meets at the Parish House on the third Thursday of every month, from September to June.

Find us on Facebook at Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/sil.lgbt.caf/

Who We Are
We are a group of LGBT parishioners and family and friends (and parents) of LGBT persons. We are a parish ministry of, by and for our lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender sisters and brothers in Christ and those who love and support them. Our ministry extends to, and embraces, the mission of the entire parish, our home.

What We Are About
Our ministry is inspired by the words of St. Ignatius: “God loves us, creates us, and wants to share life with us forever.”

First and foremost, we are creating a home at St. Ignatius Loyola where all LGBT persons and those who love and support them are welcome, and where LGBT persons are fully affirmed and celebrated.

Second, we strive to be a beacon of hope for persons who have felt marginalized and cut off from our Church, inviting them to renewal through a ministry of reconciliation and justice. We foster mutual respect, compassion and sensitivity between our parish (and other ministries in the parish) and the wider community on LGBT issues through education and dialogue.

More specifically, we follow the Ignatian Way with its three essential components:

Prayer: We provide opportunities for spiritual enrichment—prayer groups, retreats, spiritual direction— with a focus on the needs and challenges of LGBT persons and their families and friends.

Community: We build community with regular meetings and special events—lectures, cultural and social gatherings; we provide a safe and open space for fellowship, sharing and support for LGBT persons and their friends and families.

Service: Striving to be “men and women for others,” we provide volunteer opportunities, alone or in collaboration with other groups, focused on supporting LBGT persons and their needs and concerns.

Finally, we seek to be agents of change, combating personal and structural homophobia, and standing with LBGT persons, their families, friends and supporters.

Our Stories: Being LGBT and Catholic
This booklet features the stories of 6 members of the LGBT Catholics and Friends ministry sharing their personal accounts of reconciling their faith with their identity. A hard copy is available in our Narthex.

 

Registration for Private Infant Baptism

2018-2019 Interparish Religious Education Program (IREP) Registration

Please Note: Online registration for the 2018-2019 session of the Interparish Religious Education Program closes on Tuesday, September 4th at 4:00 PM. However, as space is limited, early registration is recommended.

For Grades 2 & 8 Parents: If you are a parent registering your child for Grades 2 and 8 and they have not previously attended the IREP program, you must speak with the Director of Religious Education before registering.

Required: A copy of the child’s baptismal certificate must be provided to confirm registration.

Questions? You can reach the IREP office at 212-288-3588 x609 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

2018-2019 Catechesis of the Good Shepherd Registration

The Interparish Religious Education Program of St. Ignatius Loyola offers an additional program of religious formation for preschool children, ages 3 and 4, called the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd.

This is a Montessori-based set of activities in a space called the “Atrium”. Within the Atrium, the child has the opportunity to develop a personal relationship with God through an introduction to Scripture narratives and the Liturgical traditions of the Church.

You can learn more about the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd by visiting their website at http://www.cgsusa.org


For the Fall 2018 Term
- Thursday session begins September 20th, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM


Tuition is $375 for the entire annual term. Maximum class size is 12 children of mixed ages.

To participate, a child must be 3 or 4-years-old. A copy of the child’s baptismal certificate must be provided. 

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Registration for Communal Infant Baptism

Sesquicentennial Celebration

Video: Sesquicentennial Celebration Weekend
On Saturday, October 29th & Sunday, October 30th, during our Sesquicentennial Celebration, we held, on those respective days, our Street Fair and Sesquicentennial Mass.

We invite you to look back with us with a photo presentation featuring highlights from that momentous weekend.

 

 

 

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Sesquicentennial Mass Homily
Click here to read the homily by former pastor Rev. Walter F. Modrys, S.J., from the Sunday, October 30th Sesquicentennial Mass that concluded our four-day Sesquicentennial Celebration.

 

 

 


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NY1 Visits the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola on the Eve of Our Sesquicentennial Celebration
NY1 spoke with Fr. Dennis Yesalonia and parishioners Jane & Frank Vardy about the role that the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola played in the changing face of the Upper East Side.


 

 

National Catholic Reporter Interviews St. Ignatius Loyola Pastor, Rev. Dennis Yesalonia, S.J.
The National Catholic Reporter spoke with Fr. Dennis Yesalonia, discussing our Sesquicentennial Celebration and why the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola remains such a vibrant and active presence on the Upper East Side. Click here to read the interview.

 

 

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Video: 150 Photos. 150 Years.
As our Sesquicentennial Year continues, we invite you to take a look back with us as we highlight the people who have made the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola the extraordinary parish that it is.

 

 

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St. Ignatius in the News
Catholic New York spoke with pastor Fr. Dennis Yesalonia, S.J., in advance of our Sesquicentennial Celebration in October.

Click here to read the article from this week’s issue on why the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola is a parish that “Aims ‘To Do More’.”



2017 Wallace Hall Christmas Pageant Registration

2015 Wallace Hall Christmas Pageant Registration

IREP: 7th Grade (Registered Families Only)

Welcome to the Class Review & Homework Assignments page for 7th Grade IREP students.

New content to be added shortly.

Interparish Religious Education: Registered Families Only

For Tuesday, September 19th: K-6 classes are canceled.

Click here to download the IREP calendar for the 2017-2018 academic year.
Click here to download the Student Medical Information Data Sheet.

Orientation for New Parents
Primary Role of Parents
Starting Date for Classes
The Catechesis of the Good Shepherd
Waiting Area
Attendance
Snow
Accountability
Service Projects
Security
Calendar of Events
Liturgical Services
Sacraments
Finances
Professional Services


PRIMARY ROLE OF PARENTS
Parents are the primary religious educators of their children. What an awesome responsibility! The role of catechists as religion teachers is to help parents meet their solemn obligation. Our expectation in the Interparish Religious Education Program (IREP), therefore, is that all parents will become immersed with their children in an on-going faith development. Parents are enthusiastically encouraged to set aside time each week to review the chapter which was presented in class. (There are special notes at the end of each chapter.) The focus of each book is its strong scriptural foundation - Bible reading is encouraged. Each book also has a prayer and reference section which is age appropriate and a glossary of important words to be understood.

Parents are encouraged to attend the various prayer services, social events and sacramental celebrations during the year. Your participation in these celebrations fosters a strong community of dedicated parents and strengthens our faith in Jesus as our risen Lord.


STARTING DATE FOR CLASSES
Classes begin on Monday, September 14, Tuesday, September 15, or Wednesday, September 16, depending on which day you selected for your child.

MONDAY:
Grades 1-3: 4:00 - 5:30 pm; classes held in St. Joseph Grammar School

TUESDAY:
Grades K-6: 4:15 - 5:30 pm; classes held in St. Ignatius Grammar School.
Grades 7-8: 6:00 - 7:30 pm; classes held in Loyola School.

WEDNESDAY:
Grades K-6: 4:15 - 5:30 pm; classes held in St. Ignatius Grammar School.
Grades 7-8: 6:00 - 7:30 pm; classes held in Loyola School.

The entrance to St. Ignatius Loyola Grammar School is 48 East 84 Street between Park and Madison Avenues (in the middle of the block on the south side of 84 Street just to the left of McKinnon Hall). The entrance to Loyola School is through the St. Ignatius Loyola Rectory, 980 Park Avenue, between 83 and 84 Streets on the west side of Park Avenue. St. Joseph Grammar School is located at 420 East 87 Street, between First Avenue and York Avenue.


THE CATECHESIS OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD
The Interparish Religious Education Program (IREP) of St. Ignatius Loyola will be offering an additional program of religious formation for preschool children, ages 3 and 4, called the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd. This is a Montessori-based set of activities in a new space called the “Atrium.” Within the Atrium the child has the opportunity to develop a personal relationship with God through an introduction to Scripture narratives and the Liturgical traditions of the Church.

You may learn more about the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd by visiting their website at http://www.cgsusa.org.

Classes begin the week of September 21st.


WAITING AREA
There is no waiting area available at St. Joseph Grammar School (Monday) for parents/caregivers to wait during class time.
This year there will be a waiting area available at the Parish House for Tuesday/Wednesday classes. The meeting room in the Parish House will be available from 3:15-5:20 pm. There will be a person present whose responsibility will be to open the door and maintain order in the meeting room. No child may be there without a parent/caregiver. This space is intended for quiet activities – homework, reading, etc. It is not intended as a playground. There will be a sign-in sheet, and a list of guidelines will be handed out as we begin this year.

On Mondays, dismissal will be from the cafeteria of St. Joseph Grammar School. On Tuesday and Wednesday, the gym (McKinnon Hall) at St. Ignatius will be used for dismissal. We ask all parents/caregivers to wait by the stage area and to be mindful of all announcements.
Some rules apply to our use of the School buildings. NO food or beverages are allowed upstairs in any classroom. There is absolutely NO gum chewing allowed in the building at any time. Scooters are not to be brought into the building because they represent such a hazard for the children.


ATTENDANCE
Faith formation thrives in a stable environment. It is therefore imperative that your child attend classes regularly and on time. Excessive absence will result in the possible retention of a particular grade. If unforeseen circumstances or illness prevent your child from attending a class, please call Carly-Anne Gannon at 212-861-4764 or email to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) before noon of that class day. If this is not possible, please call before the class begins so that we will not need to worry unnecessarily about the whereabouts of your child.


SNOW
The Program will not be in session on days when schools are closed due to a storm or other inclement weather conditions. We ask parents to use their discretion when sending their child(ren) on days of inclement weather.


ACCOUNTABILITY
It is the parents’ responsibility to teach their children the traditional prayers of the Catholic Church - the Hail Mary, Our Father, Glory Be to the Father (primary grades), Act of Contrition, Creed and the responses at Mass. Such knowledge is a necessary part of our faith formation. Parents are strongly encouraged to review these prayers with their children on a regular basis.

It is important that your child arrive to class each week with a book. It can be very difficult if your child is not prepared to be an active participant in the classroom activities.

There is a $20 charge to replace a lost book.

For all students in our 7th-8th grade program, a basic facts and information test will be administered. A suitable mastery of religious teaching must be demonstrated in this test in order for a student to continue in this level of the program.

For all students, a progress report designed to inform parents of their child’s progress will be sent home in March.


SERVICE PROJECTS
We are challenged to bring God’s love to others by the way we live our lives. God invites even little children to share this challenge. We can make a difference by our response to this call to service. And so this year we continue our involvement with a number of programs: Food Drives throughout the year and the Toy Drive in December that benefit the Yorkville Common Pantry, and finally our Lenten Project—Pennies for Progress. These service projects give our children the opportunity to help those who are less fortunate.

The 8th grade Confirmation candidates have a service requirement as part of their preparation to receive the Sacrament. More information will follow.


SECURITY
Your child’s safety is a major concern to us and if there is any doubt about the identity of the adult coming to pick up your child, we will always err on the side of caution.

A security person will be in attendance at the entrance to St. Joseph, and St. Ignatius Loyola Grammar Schools on Mondays (for St. Joseph), Tuesdays and Wednesdays (for St. Ignatius). If your child has a special schedule on a particular day or other unusual circumstances prevail, or if you have a complicated family/caregiver situation that you feel we should be made aware of, please telephone or e-mail Carly-Anne Gannon at the above phone number or e-mail location. If there is sufficient time, please send a written message and follow it up with a telephone call.

We ask that you pick up your child promptly. On Mondays, an adult will stay with any child who has not been picked up. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays, a child not picked up by a responsible adult by 6pm will be escorted to the Rectory, 980 Park Avenue, for delayed pick-up. In either case, if this becomes a continuing problem, a late fee of $20 will be charged each day. Thank you for your cooperation.

A gentle reminder – please do not expect a young child (K – 4th grade) to leave the building alone to meet a parent/caregiver in a waiting car. This is not a safe practice and, for safety considerations, we cannot permit it.

In our society today, it is very important that we can reach parents. Please make sure that your emergency numbers are up to date, but, most importantly, please make sure your child knows your telephone number(s).

If you move during the school year, please notify us of the necessary changes in address and telephone number.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Click here to download a calendar for the academic year.

The calendar lists scheduled events, though minor changes or additions may be necessary at a later date. You will be notified in advance of these changes. We will also send e-mail updates to the calendar and reminders every month. Parents of students receiving First Holy Communion (2nd graders) and Confirmation (8th graders) will receive a list of Dates at a Glance for meetings and events throughout the school year.


LITURGICAL SERVICES
Liturgical services are the occasions when we come together to pray as a community. They represent an important dimension of our Program and parents are strongly encouraged to attend these services. Our liturgies on Sunday are now at 9:30 am in the Church and 11 am in Wallace Hall. At both of these masses, the children will be invited to participate in a separate Liturgy of the Word purposely designed to meet their needs and to involve their active participation.


SACRAMENTS
Parents’ attendance at the special preparation meetings and prayer services for first communion, first confession and confirmation and Family Faith Formation sessions are extremely important. Attendance at these meetings is obligatory for parents. For a child can fully appreciate and enter into the sacramental celebration only if the child’s primary teacher, that is the parent, is actively involved in the preparation process. In fairness to the child, therefore, we may need to delay the child’s reception of the sacrament in order to give the child more time to make up for the parents’ lack of involvement.

Please note – second graders (those children who are in either 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E or 2SJ) will be receiving both their First Reconciliation and First Holy Communion this year.


FINANCES
The Interparish Religious Education Program held at St. Ignatius, and St. Joseph is a joint effort of the parishes on the East Side of Manhattan to provide quality religious education to their parishioners. We apply no geographical restrictions to families who wish their children to participate in the Program.

The Program, therefore, in order to provide quality education, must be financially self-sufficient. The tuition charge is based on the real out of pocket cost of the Program’s services. (The Program is not charged for the use of parish and school facilities and other resources at St. Joseph, or St. Ignatius.) Though some financial assistance is available to families, we ask every parent to support the Program financially to ensure that the Program can meet its expenses. To receive financial aid, a parent must fill out an application form at the time of registration. Requests for aid are granted only on a yearly basis. We ask those families who can do so to contribute financially even beyond the tuition payment so that we can offer some financial assistance to needy families who want their children to learn the saving truth of Jesus Christ.


PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Parents have often requested a reference for professional psychological services either for themselves or for their children when they are experiencing difficulties and some assistance seems called for.

We highly recommend:
Kenwood Psychological Services
David M. Kelley, Ph.D., Director
124 East 84 Street, Suite 1D
New York, NY 10028
212 744 2121

Dr. Kelley takes great care in selecting an appropriate therapist or counselor to meet the needs and requirements of each person requesting assistance.

Family Ministry

About The Family Ministry
The Family Ministry’s mission is to strengthen our faith community through participation in the sacraments, prayer, and service. All of our service projects are fulfilled as a family.

Together, we live out the commission “to Love and Serve the Lord,” following His example to serve those on the margins of society and those most in need through age-appropriate community service opportunities for our families with children of all ages.

We seek to “become what [we] are, the domestic church and the heart of the world” (Saint John Paul II), by strengthening the connections between our home, our faith, and society. These bonds of fellowship and friendship form the foundation of who we are as a faith community. 

Our Ministry is organized through a committee of parents that represents the diversity of our parish.


Inaugural Family Ministry Potluck Dinner
Click here to view the full photo gallery from the Potluck Dinner.

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Space Rental Reservation Form

  • Venue Reservation Form

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Parish House

There are several meeting rooms available in our Parish House for smaller events, from board meetings and parties, to small receptions following baptisms, funerals or memorial services in the Church.


The Parish Lounge - (15 x 40 or approximately 550 square feet)
The Parish Lounge can seat 45 people audience style or 25-30 people around large tables for luncheons or board meetings. For catered events, the space can accommodate stand up receptions for 40-50 people or a full luncheon for 25.

Kitchen
A full size kitchen adjoins both lounges. Large stove, refrigerator and plenty of counter space. Pass thru window into Parish Lounge and Hoefner Lounge.

This entire floor is ideal for events that require additional space for larger groups.


Meeting Room (15 x 29 or 420 square feet)
Located on the street level, this space is suitable for meetings or lectures hosting 20-45 people.

Rest Rooms are on both floors.

TV/Video monitor in the Parish Lounge is available upon request for an additional charge.

Air conditioning available for an additional fee.

Wallace Hall

Below the main level of the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, on Park Avenue and 84th Street, lies Wallace Hall, one of Manhattan’s most beautiful and versatile rental spaces.

Built in the 1880’s as a lower Church and auxiliary chapel, the hall was fully renovated in 1990.

The magnificent atrium retains the beauty of its original Gothic design. The Park Avenue entrance leads through a stone archway into a soaring vaulted ballroom, interspersed with stone columns rising to the 30-foot ceiling.

Colorful stained glass windows (backlit at night) adorn the Hall on three sides, and the stage at the far end is made of intricately carved solid oak. The design of the terrazzo floor, which is suitable for dancing, subtly suggests the rows of pews of long ago.

Wallace Hall contains 8,000 square feet of floor space and a fully equipped stage over 30 feet deep. The hall is air-conditioned with a modern kitchen, restroom facilities, and sound system.

This elegant space is available for a variety of events including fundraisers, wedding receptions, cocktails, buffet, and formal banquet-style dinners from 100 to 900 guests. This versatile space is also excellent for special exhibits, auctions, cultural performances, business and sales conferences, lectures, workshops, auditions, and film shoots.

Click here to view a photo gallery of Wallace Hall.

Overall Features and Dimensions

Park Avenue Entrance. Features stained glass windows on the north and south walls, a stage at west end, with an entrance and restrooms at east end. Terrazzo floor or stage floor suitable for dancing.

Stage
Well-suited for concerts, lectures, performances
- Stage dimensions: 40 ft wide x 30 ft deep
- Steps on both sides of stage for convenient access
- Track lighting
- Removable railings at front
- Piano available for rent

Sound System
The sound system consists of:
- Speaker podium
- 2 independent wireless microphone systems
- CD and Tape player

Kitchen
Well-suited for preparation of hors d’oeuvres, and the warming and serving of full meals.
- Set-up, prep, and warming space
- Stove with two ovens, microwave
- Sinks
- Large refrigerator
- Institutional coffeemaker
- Optional kitchen extension with use of screens

 

Job Transition Support Group

Bringing together a group of experienced professionals looking to secure employment, we hope to help each other in the job search process. Parishioners will be invited to contribute their expertise and knowledge.

Meets on Wednesdays at 10:00 AM in the Parish Lounge.

Please bring your resume to all meetings. All are welcome.


Resources:
- The Forty-Year Vision

- How to Decide What You Want

Home

Redirect page.

Credits

Website design and development by Russell Stoll: www.russellstoll.net

Photography by Laurie Lambrecht (www.laurielambrecht.com), Bernard J. Reilly, and members of the Parish Staff.

Music This Month

Music at St. Ignatius Loyola Monthly Highlights:

To download the September 2017 highlights

Click Here

To download the June 2017 highlights

Click Here

To download the May 2017 highlights

Click Here

To download the April 2017 highlights

Click Here

To download the March 2017 highlights

Click Here

To download the February 2017 highlights

Click Here

To download the January 2017 highlights

Click Here

To download the December 2016 highlights

Click Here

To download the November 2016 highlights

Click Here

Ignatian 40s

Ignatian 40s is the St. Ignatius Loyola ministry for Catholics in their 40s (as well as late 30s and early 50s).  We organize spiritual, service and social activities which support a deeper understanding and practice of our faith and a stronger connection with one another.

To join our mailing list and learn more about our upcoming events, please email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)


Potluck Wine, Cheese, & Chocolate Social

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Lay Ministers’ Enrichment

Who We Are and What We Do
LME is a ministry that organizes days of spiritual enrichment for the entire parish community.  LME programs offer members of the parish and guests time to pray together, learn together, get to know each other, and deepen the faith of the parish community.

Who Participates in LME Programs
All are welcome. Our events are held in Wallace Hall adjacent to the church three times a year and feature a guest presenter/facilitator on topics selected for each program. Our participants are engaged and value interacting with each other in small faith sharing or discussion groups as much as they do interacting with the day’s facilitator. In some formats, attendees enjoy the opportunity to ask questions, often relating the presenter’s topic with their own life experience. Our days begin with breakfast and include lunch, which offers more fellowship time. We conclude the day with Mass or a prayer service.

Registration
Upcoming LME programs are announced on the St. Ignatius website and in the Sunday bulletin. Registration is required; details on how and when to register are included in each program announcement.

Topics of the 2010-2011 were:
• Jesus’ Ministry and Yours
• Baptism, Confirmation … Then What?

• The Power of Liturgy: In Your Life, In Your Church, In Your Ministry

Topics of the 2011-2012 programs were:
• Your Call: To God, To Church, To Ministry
• Living Our Vocations: God’s Will, Our Desires

• Presence is Abundance: Engaging Life’s Conversations

Topics of the 2012-2013 day-long programs were:
• Compassion: Facing Challenges in Life, Church, and Ministry
• The Power of Invitation: Friendship with Christ in Ministry
• Our Sacred Story Nestled in the Ordinary

Topics of the 2013-2014 programs were:
• The Year of the Family: A Journey From the Vatican to the Street and Back Again
• Bring Contemplation Into Action. Bringing Action Into Contemplation: Seeking Awareness of Christ’s Presence in Everyday Life and in Your Ministry

Topics of the 2014-2015 programs were:
• The God Whom Lay Ministers Serve and Represent
• Worship the Lord in the Beauty of Holiness: Music and Worship at St. Ignatius Loyola
• See What Love the Father Has Bestowed On Us: A Mini Retreat Experience of the First Exercises

Topics of the 2015-2016 programs were:
• Being Mercy Where You Are
• A Lot of Things: Wisdom from the Book of Expectations

Topics of the 2016-2017 programs were:
• Discernment and Decisions in an Age of Distraction

Topics of the 2017-2018 programs were:
• St. Joseph: Companion in Change
• Spirituality for Both Halves of Life

Faith Formation

This information is being revised.

Bible Study

Please check back in the Fall.

Adult Education


Lectures on a wide variety of topics are offered throughout the year.

 

 


Past topics and speakers have included:

Africa

Death and Destruction in Darfur: Militarization of the Humanitarian Crisis
Suliman Baldo, Director, Africa Program, International Crisis Group
Fr. Michael Perry, OFM, Coordinator, Africa Desk, Franciscans International

How to Build an Oasis in Ethiopia: The Vision and Practice of Creating a Sustainable Environment
Woldetensaé Ghebreghiorghis, O.F.M. Cap., Bishop of Harar, Ethiopia and Mr. Zemede Abebe, Program Director of the Hararghe Catholic Secretariat.
Sponsored by Faith in Africa at Church of St.Ignatius Loyola.

The Arts

Art & Faith Celebrate the Paschal Mystery
Rev. Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J., President Emeritus of Georgetown University

Art and Love in Renaissance Italy
Andrea Bayer, Curator of the Exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

At Prayer: Private Prayer and Community Worship
Rev. Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J., President Emeritus of Georgetown University

Damien: A One Man Play
Written by Aldyth Morris and starring Casey Groves. The true story of Father Damien of Moloka’i.

Faith and Film Series
Antonio Monda, faculty member at the Kanbar Institute of Film and Television, Tisch School of the Arts at New York University.

Longing for the Prince of Peace, While Facing the Horrors of War
Rev. Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J., President Emeritus of Georgetown University.

The Role of John the Baptist as the Forerunner of Jesus & Model for Us Today
Rev. Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J., President Emeritus of Georgetown University.

Tapestry in the Baroque: Threads of Splendor
Thomas P. Campbell, Curator of the Exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Wounded Body of Christ and the Modern Social Conscience
Rev. Terrence Dempsey, S.J., Director of the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art at St. Louis University.

With Refugees on the Way of the Cross
Rev. Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J., President Emeritus of Georgetown University


Authors


The Abbey: A Story of Discovery
Rev. James Martin, S.J., assisting priest at Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, author, and Editor-at-Large of America, the national Catholic magazine.

Become a Saint (in twenty minutes)
Rev. James Martin, S.J., assisting priest at Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, author, and editor-at-large of America, the national Catholic magazine.

How to Raise a Drug-Free Kid
Author Joseph A. Califano, Founder and Chairman of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University and former U.S. Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Julian’s Gospel: Illuminating the Life & Revelations of Julian of Norwich
Author Veronica Mary Rolf, independent scholar and leader of the lecture series, “Mornings with Julian.”

Left to Tell: Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust
Author Immaculée Ilibagiza

Your Life Calling: Reimagining the Rest of Your Life
Jane Pauley, broadcast journalist and author

What Happened at Vatican II? What difference does it make 50 years later?
Rev. John O’Malley, S.J., author of The First Jesuits and member of the Georgetown University faculty.


The Church

Becoming a Community of Disciples
Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J.

Identity & Inclusiveness: A Tug of War in Today’s Church
Peter Steinfels, Co-director of the Center on Religion and Culture, Fordham University

The Laments of the People of God in the American Catholic Church Today: What Do We Lament and How Can We Respond?
Bradford Hinze, PhD., Fordham University Professor of Theology.

Law in the Roman Catholic Church: From Principles to Practice Lecture Series
Fr. Michael P. Hilbert, S.J., Associate Pastor

Pope Francis & His Message for Our Time
Robert Ellsberg, Publisher and editor-in-chief, Orbis Books

Christ in Evolution: Teilhard’s Vision
Sr. Ilia Delio, OSF, Ph.D., Director of Catholic Studies, Georgetown University

Vatican II, Women, and the Church Today

Featured speaker

Margaret Steinfels, Co-Director of the Fordham University Center on Religion and Culture.

Panelists

Rev. James Dugan, S.J., Sr. Vivienne Joyce, SC, Adjunct Professor, Fordham University Spiritual Direction Program, and Karen Smith, Editorial Director of America, the national Catholic magazine.

Where is the Church Going? A Discussion on Pope Francis and the Year of Mercy
Fr. Matt Malone, S.J., Editor-in-Chief, America Magazine & Fr. James Martin, S.J., Editor-at-Large, America Magazine


Finance

New Strategies for Getting Your Wealth on Track
A financial forum for all those who are 50+. Guest speaker: CNBCs Larry Kudlow. Sponsored by Boomers & Beyond.


Inter-Faith

The Faith Club: A Unique Inter-Faith Dialogue
Ranya Idilby, Suzanne Oliver, and Priscilla Warner, co-authors of The Faith Club: A Muslim, a Christian, a Jew – Three Women Search for Understanding.

Muslims and Christians: Where Do We Stand?
A Woodstock Forum featuring three Jesuits (Rev. Daniel Madigan, S.J., Rev. Patrick Ryan, S.J., and Rev. Aloysius Mowe, S.J.) who have lived and worked with Muslims over many years in various parts of the world.


Scripture

Apples and Eve: Creation and Original Sin
A five-session series sponsored by the Ignatian Young Adults.

Does God Lie? (And other questions the Bible raises)
An interactive discussion moderated by Rev. Anthony SooHoo, S.J., Associate Pastor at Church of St. Ignatius Loyola. Sponsored by the Ignatian Young Adults

An Exploration of the Gospel of John the Baptist
A six-session class led by Brian Pinter, Education Associate and Bible scholar-in-residence at Christ Church United Methodist

The Faces of Advent: Isaiah, John the Baptist, Joseph, and Mary
An Advent Series sponsored by the Ignatian Young Adults.

How to Interpret The Bible: From Augustine to Bergoglio
Fr. Peter Dubovsky, S.J., Dean of the Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome

Scripture Reflections: Rev. Robert O’Brien, S.J.
Fr. O’Brien is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at LeMoyne College in Syracuse and member of the St. Ignatius Jesuit Community. Fr. O’Brien conducts a weekly Scripture Reflections Group during the year, in addition to offering Scripture reflections throughout Advent and Lent.

St. Paul: The Story of a Passionate Apostle
A six-session class led by Brian Pinter, Education Associate and Bible scholar-in-residence at Christ Church United Methodist


Society

Global Poverty: What Everyone Needs to Know
Thomas Nazario, Founder of The Forgotten International and author of Living On a Day a Day

Homeboy Industries: Jobs, Not Jails
Rev. Greg Boyle, S.J., founder of HomeBoy Industries, a jobs program recognized as the largest gang intervention program in the United States.

The Hope and the Heartbreak: The Challenges of Modern Christians
Dr. Bishara Ebeid, Pontifical Oriental Institute

Human Trafficking/Modern Slavery
Moderated by Sr. Kati Hamm, S.C., Education Coordinator, LifeWay Network

Retreats

SPIRITUAL EXERCISES OF ST. IGNATIUS IN DAILY LIFE:
19th ANNOTATION RETREAT

St. Ignatius Loyola, founder of the Society of Jesus, had a profound religious conversion as a layman. Later, he reflected on his experience and recorded his experience in a book called The Spiritual Exercises. An adaptation of his experience, called the 19th Annotation Retreat, can be made in the midst of daily life over a period of thirty weeks.

The retreat offers one an opportunity to grow in intimacy with God, to discover one’s deep desires, to notice God’s movements in one’s life and respond to them, to grow in freedom in making choices, to connect one’s life experience with the life, death and resurrection of Christ, and to find God in all things.


MEETING CHRIST IN PRAYER

“Then you will call upon me and come to me and pray to me, and I will listen you. You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.”
                                                          - Jeremiah 29:12-13

Meeting Christ In Prayer is an interactive 8-week guided prayer experience for small groups. Based on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola, it introduces participants to various ways of praying and provides an opportunity to support one another through faith sharing.

Centering Prayer

Be still, and know that I am God! (Psalm 46:10)

St. Ignatius hosts a Centering Prayer group that offers an opportunity to learn and practice this form of prayer. This group meets every Monday at 6:30 PM in the Parish House. Beginners as well as advanced practitioners are welcome.

We welcome participants who have little or no experience with centering prayer. The group studies books about centering prayer as well as centering prayer tapes. We have very lively conversations focused on these resources as well as our own practice of the method.

“Contemplative prayer has to be always very simple, confined to the simplest of acts.”
— Thomas Merton


An Overview of Centering Prayer:

Choose a sacred word of one or two syllables, with spiritual meaning that is not distractingly important to you and easy to say. Examples of sacred words include Amen, Abba, Let Go, Oneness, Peace, Silence, Stillness.

Choose a place to sit.

Sit comfortably. You can sit cross-legged, full or half lotus, kneeling with a cushion or bench under your rear, or sit in a chair that allows you to plant your feet with your back supported. The point is simply to balance our bodies in an upright posture, so there is no need for adjustments while sitting, and to encourage alertness.

Time: 20 minutes or more. If you cannot do 20 minutes at first, do less rather than not doing it. However, something happens to the stillness around 10 to 15 minutes in that you will miss. That’s why 20+ is nearly universal.

Eyes open or closed. Whatever works best for you is fine.

Settle briefly, and silently introduce the sacred word. By saying the sacred word silently to yourself to start the sitting period, you are reminding yourself of your intention to let go of thoughts and to welcome God’s presence and action within. This is not a mantra, which is repeated throughout as a way of occupying the mind. You do it once, a few times, or for the first few minutes. It is similar to focusing on the breath, a very popular technique. If you find it easier to do that, it is acceptable.

Resist no thought, retain no thought, react to no thought. When you realize you are engaged with your thoughts, including sensations and feelings, return ever-so-gently to the sacred word. This is what it’s all about. You will drift into not needing the word, just “resting in God.” Then you’ll realize you’re thinking about something—say the sacred word to yourself and let the thought go. The silence may last a while, or you may stay in the attachment-surrender loop the whole time. The goal is not constant emptiness. As Reverend Cynthia Bourgeault says, “Striving for emptiness is a surefire way to guarantee that your meditation will be a constant stream of thoughts.”

• At the end of the period, either use the timer’s tone as the endpoint, or say a prayer, gently and slowly. Remain in silence for a minute or two.

For information about local events and other resources, visit the Contemplative Outreach NYC Chapter website at http://www.centeringprayerny.com

Anointing of the Sick


The Parish provides two opportunities during the year to receive the healing strength of the Sacrament of the Sick as a community for those who are seriously ill, elderly, disabled, facing surgery, or who are afflicted with any other condition of physical, mental, or spiritual suffering.

These liturgies are designed so that the community can support those members who are suffering. 

 

Welcome!

Welcome to the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, ministering to the Manhattan community since 1851. Entrusted in 1866 to the administration of the Society of Jesus, St. Ignatius Loyola Parish today continues to be staffed by Jesuit priests and lay men and women. read more

Boomers & Beyond

If you are 50+, married/single/widowed/divorced/separated, and interested in participating in social, cultural, spiritual, intellectual or community service activities, Boomers & Beyond is for you. Join with other energetic, upbeat people from the Catholic parishes of the Upper East Side.

For further information, contact Boomers & Beyond by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Ignatian Volunteer Corps

The Ignatian Volunteer Corps provides semi-retired and retired adults age 50 and over with the opportunity to volunteer two days a week from mid-September through mid-June.

Volunteers serve the needs of people who are economically impoverished at nonprofit schools and agencies in the community. Ignatian Volunteers work for a more just society and to grow deeper in Christian faith by reflecting and praying on a monthly basis with other volunteers in the Jesuit tradition. Volunteers also engage in other spiritual formation opportunities including retreats and spiritual direction.

Christian Life Community

Christian Life Community (CLC) is an Ignatian community of lay people who are associated with the Society of Jesus and who desire to find God more readily in prayer and in daily life. CLC meets in the Parish House every other Tuesday evening at 7:00 PM.

If interested, please contact Steve Macy at 212-830-9302 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Regular Offertory Giving, One Time Donations, and Specific Month Donations

Stewardship is our response to the Gospel imperative to live in an attitude of gratitude to God for the many gifts we are given. We give back to God, through the Church, a portion of what God has given to us. The most obvious way we do this is through financial support of our parish and through donations to other charitable institutions. This is a necessary and responsible way to participate in the life of the parish and to insure that the many programs offered by the parish and charitable organizations may continue. But the concept of Stewardship goes beyond the financial. We are encouraged to share time and talent as well as treasure. Do you have gifts that would enrich our parish? Perhaps you could teach Religious Education to children once a week, or English to an adult. Maybe your gift of hospitality or compassion would enable you to volunteer in our overnight shelter or to join our St. Vincent de Paul Society. Perhaps your love for the Liturgy will prompt you to become a Eucharistic Minister or Lector. At St. Ignatius you will find many ways to practice stewardship, and your rewards will be many. Stewardship reminds us that God comes before all else and that everything we have comes from God.

September 21st: Our online donation link is currently being updated.

Thank You

Thank you for registering!

Your information will be updated in our Parishioner Registry.

Sacramental Records

Sacramental Certificates
To request a copy of a Certificate for a Sacrament received at Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, please .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or fax to 212-734-3671 the following information (no phone calls, please):

  • Name of Sacrament
  • Date of celebration
  • Name(s), including maiden name where applicable
  • Your address

A donation is gratefully requested.

Godparents and Confirmation Sponsors
You may request a letter from our Pastor in order to be a Godparent or Confirmation Sponsor. Click .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) to email your request or you may fax your request to 212-734-3671 (no phone calls, please).

 

 

 

 

Donate to Music

- Donate to the Advent and Christmas Music Fund: https://donate.stignatiusloyola.org/christmasmusic

- Donate to the Lent and Easter Music Fund: https://donate.stignatiusloyola.org/eastermusic

- Donate to Sacred Music in a Sacred Space: https://www.showclix.com/event/friends-of-sacred-music-17-18

- Donate to the Joachim Parrella Memorial Organ Fund: https://donate.stignatiusloyola.org/parrellamemorial

IGNITE! Teen Ministry





Ignite is a forming a community of high school students guided by Ignatian spirituality though Saturday sessions, small groups, retreats, and more.

This year we will attend 2 retreats at Harmony Farm and send a group of Juniors and Seniors to the Ignatian Family Teach In in DC.

IGNITE! meetings are held in the Parish House every 1st & 3rd Saturday of the month (except July and August).

Parents can register their teens here: https://form.jotform.com/71575444498166


Self-Help Groups

St. Ignatius Loyola hosts many twelve-step programs weekly. Below is a listing of meetings at the Parish House at 980 Park Avenue (between 83rd and 84th Streets) and at the Saint Ignatius Loyola Grammar School at 48 East 84th Street.

*On holidays, please confirm meetings by calling the Parish House in advance at 212-288-3588, in case of cancellation.


Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) 
Sundays from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM in Grammar School Cafeteria. Enter through the Grammar School on East 84th Street.

Sundays from 7:45 PM to 8:45 PM in Grammar School Cafeteria. Enter through the Grammar School on East 84th Street.

Tuesdays from 6:15 PM to 7:30 PM in Grammar School Cafeteria. Enter through the Grammar School on East 84th Street.

Tuesdays from 7:45 PM to 8:45 PM in Grammar School Cafeteria. Enter through the Grammar School on East 84th Street.

Saturdays from 3:15 PM to 4:15 PM in the Meeting Room at the Parish House.


Al-Anon
Sundays from 7:30 PM to 8:30 PM in the Meeting Room at the Parish House.


Debtors Anonymous (DA)
Debtors Anonymous: Steps to Prosperity
 
Fridays from 7:15 PM to 8:45 PM in the Meeting Room at the Parish House.

Debtors Anonymous (DA)
Debtors Anonymous: Clearing the Way
 
Sundays from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM in the Meeting Room at the Parish House.


Overeaters Anonymous (OA)   
Saturdays from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM in the Meeting Room at the Parish House.

Praying the Stations of the Cross

We’re in the process of refurbishing these pages. 

Please visit our existing pages in the meantime.

Sacred Music in a Sacred Space Recordings

Take us home with you! The musicians at St. Ignatius Loyola have recorded a variety of CDs, featuring both their stunning chorus and the magnificent N.P. Mander Pipe Organ.

Cool of the DayCool of the Day
Mixing Gregorian chant with spirituals, Renaissance motets with Romantic motets — from the sound of a single voice calling out to the astonishing radiance of a full choir — this breathtaking recording celebrates the glory and transcendence of the human voice. The pillar of this collection is Richard Strauss’s rarely performed Deutsche Motette. Recorded live in February 2011.

AngelAngel
The debut recording of the Saint Ignatius Loyola Children’s Choir offers fresh interpretations of classics like Panis Angelicus, How can I keep from singing, When I survey the wondrous cross, My shepherd will supply my need, Humbly I adore thee, and much more.  Recorded in 2011.

Concerto for Choir/Lamentations of JeremiahConcerto for Choir/Lamentations of Jeremiah
The Choir of St. Ignatius sings Alfred Schnittke’s monumental a cappella masterpiece, the Concerto for Choir, and Alberto Ginastera’s dramatic Lamentations of Jeremiah. Recorded live in February 2008.

Wondrous LoveWondrous Love
The Choir of St. Ignatius shines in thisrecording featuring stunning a cappella works spanning 1,000 years of sacred music.  Including Hailstork’s Motherless Child, MacMillan’s Christus Vincit, Bach’s Komm, Jesu, komm and much more.
Download a selection from this CD (3.9 MB)

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Duruflé:RequiemDuruflé: Requiem
Duruflé’s extraordinarily beautiful Requiem performed in its original version for choir and organ, featuring the Choir with Metropolitan Opera soprano Kaaren Erickson, cellist Arthur Fiacco and organist Nancianne Parrella. Remastered in 2005.
Download a selection from this CD (3.3 MB)
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Les Corps GlorieuxLes Corps Glorieux: Music for Organ, Harp & Violoncello
This sublime collection features organist Nancianne Parrella, harpist Victoria Drake and cellist Arthur Fiacco in original works and transcriptions by Saint-Saëns, Handel, Messiaen, Mägi and Henri Büsser’s exquisite Sleep of the Infant Jesus.
Download a selection from this CD (9.7 MB)

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Rachmaninov:VespersRachmaninov: Vespers (All-Night Vigil)
Rachmaninov’s moving All-Night Vigil is a monumental choral setting of the Russian Orthodox vigil service, blending traditional Russian chant with glorious harmonies.
Download a selection from this CD (1.9 MB)

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Silent Night: Music for Advent & ChristmasSilent Night: Music for Advent & Christmas
A holiday favorite! Featuring the acclaimed Choir of St. Ignatius singing chant, motets and carols of the season, plus organ music of Bach and Brahms.  This recording will surely put you in the Christmas spirit!
Download a selection from this CD (2.7 MB)

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O Vos OmnesO Vos Omnes: Music for Lent & Holy Week
The meditative mood of the holiest of seasons, including Allegri’s enchanting Miserere, Gregorian chant and Renaissance motets of Palestrina and Byrd, movingly performed by the Choir of St. Ignatius.
Download a selection from this CD (2.6 MB)

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The Romantic OrganThe Romantic Organ
One of Audiophile Audition’s Best Recordings of the Year for 1996.  Includes works of Mendelssohn, Bruckner, Brahms, Liszt, Widor and more.  Kent Tritle, organ.
Download a selection from this CD (2.5 MB)

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Kent Tritle at St. Ignatius LoyolaKent Tritle at St. Ignatius Loyola
This recording from 1994 demonstrates the power and subtlety of the magnificent N.P. Mander Pipe Organ. Features works of Franck, Duruflé, Persichetti, Bach, De Grigny and more.
Download a selection from this CD (3.1 MB)

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JubilationsJubilations!
Joy abounds in this collection of music for organ, brass and percussion.  Nancianne Parrella, organ; St. Ignatius Brass; Kent Tritle, conductor.  Includes works of Vierne, Eben, Strauss, Bliss, Widor, White and Guilmant.
Download a selection from this CD (2.0 MB)

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DVD: Creating the Stradivarius of Organs and The OrganistasNEW! DVD: Creating the Stradivarius of Organs and The Organistas by Bert Shapiro A behind-the-scenes look at the remarkable journey of the design and installation of St. Ignatius Loyola’s magnificent N.P. Mander Pipe Organ.  The Organistas, winner of The Directors Choice Award at the 2005 Black Maria Film Festival, features discussions and performances with organ designers, builders and master musicians revealing their passion for the “King of Instruments.”


NOTE: You will need Real Player or Windows Media Player to play our downloadable music samples

 

Ignatian Young Adults

This initiative is a Parish response towards satisfying four key areas of interest for Young Adults. These key areas are:

Ongoing Events

Sunday Socials:
The IYA hosts socials for young adults (ages 21-39) in Wallace Hall from September through June following the Sunday evening 7:30 PM Mass.

To receive updates on IYA events and other opportunities, please sign up for our email list at http://tinyurl.com/IgnatianYoungAdults

You can also follow us on Facebook.



Upcoming Events at St. Ignatius

Just Faith

some information

St. Vincent de Paul

St Vincent de Paul

The St. Lawrence O’Toole Conference of the St. Vincent de Paul Society is one of the oldest SVdP Conferences in the United States. Our Conference has been active since it was formed in December of 1865 (only thirty-two years after the original Society of Saint Vincent de Paul was founded in France).

Our primary goal is our spiritual growth, but our common ministry endeavors to alleviate suffering from poverty, loneliness, hunger, homelessness, and financial desperation. We assist people of all faiths and backgrounds.

We meet in the Conference Room every other Wednesday at 7:00 PM. We begin each meeting with a spiritual reading and lively discussion of the upcoming Sunday’s gospel before we discuss our projects.

We make home visits to those who call for financial assistance. Visiting in pairs, we listen to their story and their needs so that we can discern how best to help them.

We coordinate a women’s shelter for the homeless during the winter months. Our Shelter operates every other weekend—evenings, Friday through Sunday—from November through April. The women are given a hot meal when they arrive. They have a warm bed overnight and are provided with breakfast in the morning before they leave. We have volunteers who setup each night, in addition to volunteers who stay overnight.

Once a month, we sponsor Dinner at Ronald McDonald House. We provide a delicious dinner to pediatric cancer patients, their families, and the staff — typically 100 people each time.

In addition to the food and toy drives that we organize throughout the year, we also coordinate The Christmas Angel Project. Two local parishes provide us with a list of people in need and the preferred gift choices for them. We collect over 400 wrapped presents from generous St. Ignatius parishioners to give to those two parishes.

If you would like to volunteer for any activities, please leave a message for Teresa Abruzzo at the Parish House (212-288-3588).

For more information about the work of SVdP, please visit the website for the Society of St. Vincent de Paul of New York City at http://www.svdpnyc.org

Music Staff

 

K. Scott Warren K. SCOTT WARREN, Artistic Director
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Since 2011, Director of Music Ministries K. Scott Warren has led a dynamic music team consisting of over 150 individuals, professional and volunteer, in providing music at approximately 400 liturgies annually. He is the principal conductor of the 18-voice professional Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola, which sings a demanding schedule of services throughout the year, with repertoire spanning Gregorian chant to 21st-century masterpieces. The choir, along with the Orchestra of St. Ignatius Loyola, form the backbone of the parish’s critically acclaimed concert series, Sacred Music in a Sacred Space, whose recent performances have been lauded by the New York Times as “stirring…positively thrilling” and “broad, wide-ranging, and powerful”. In addition to the vast choral spectrum presented at St. Ignatius, Mr. Warren presides over the four manual, 91-rank N. P. Mander Organ, the largest mechanical action organ in the New York metro area, and an instrument of international stature.

From 2002 to 2004, Mr. Warren served as Assistant Organist at Temple Emanu-El, Fifth Avenue, becoming Organist and Choirmaster in 2006. In this capacity he leads the 17-voice professional Temple Emanu-El Choir in 120 full choral liturgies annually. The Temple boasts three pipe organs, including the Main Sanctuary organ, originally built in 1929 by Casavant (dedicated by Marcel Dupré), most recently renovated by Sebastian Glück in 2002.

As a collaborative musician, Mr. Warren has appeared as organist with the New York Philharmonic, the American Symphony Orchestra, the New York Pops, the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, and the Dresden Philharmonic, in venues ranging from Carnegie and Avery Fisher Halls to the Ravinia and Bravo! Vail music festivals. Mr. Warren has also had an active career as choral accompanist, working with Voices of Ascension, Musica Sacra, the Choir of Trinity Church Wall Street, the Oratorio Society of New York, and the New Jersey Oratorio Society, among others. His work as accompanist has been featured on National Public Radio.

Mr. Warren is a native of Dallas, Texas, and a graduate of the University of North Texas, where he studied organ with Dr. Jesse E. Eschbach. His choral music is published by Oxford University Press, and has been performed throughout Asia, Europe and North America.



Daniel Beckwith DANIEL BECKWITH, Principal Organist
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Daniel Beckwith is Principal Organist at St. Ignatius Loyola and Assistant Organist at Temple Emanu-El, both in New York City. Former church positions include the posts of Assistant Organist at several New York City landmark houses of worship: The Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, St. Bartholomew’s Church, and The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine.

Mr. Beckwith has conducted in many of the major opera houses throughout North America and Europe. With a repertoire that spans the 17th through the 20th centuries, he has been hailed as one of the most exciting conductors of his generation.

Mr. Beckwith’s Metropolitan Opera debut was with Don Giovanni in 1995. On the strength of these performances, he was engaged for several important debuts conducting the works of Handel, both nationally (Serse, Seattle Opera) and internationally (Rinaldo, Grand Theâtre du Genève; Theodora, Glyndebourne Festival).

His return engagement to the Metropolitan, as well as his San Francisco Opera and Portland Opera debuts was with Don Giovanni; Le Nozze di Figaro for the companies of Vancouver, Baltimore, Edmonton and Arizona. Daniel Beckwith’s Australian opera debut in 1998 was with a personal favorite, La Clemenza di Tito. Mr. Beckwith’s return engagement to the Seattle Opera and his debut with the Washington Opera was with Die Zauberflöte.

His love of, and affinity for, the baroque, early classical, and the bel canto repertory has given him the opportunity to perform many of the cornerstone operas of these varying periods: Gluck’s Orphée et Euridice, Cimarosa’s Il Matrimonio Segreto, Lucia di Lammermoor, Il Barbiere di Siviglia, La Cenerentola, L’Elisir d’Amore, L’Italiana in Algeri, and the U.S. Premiere of Handel’s Oreste. The vehicle of his April 2000 New York City Opera debut was a new production of Rameau’s Platée with the Mark Morris Dance Group.

Other operas in Mr. Beckwith’s increasingly diverse repertory include Monteverdi’s Il Ritorno d’Ulisse in Patria, The Rape of Lucretia, Alcina, Giulio Cesare, The Crucible, Roméo et Juliette, Susannah, Don Pasquale, Carmen, Mozart’s Il Re Pastore, Turandot, Falstaff, Die Entführung aus dem Serail, Così fan tutte, Madama Butterfly, Les Contes d’Hoffmann, La Bohème and Ariadne auf Naxos.

A frequent partner with soprano Renée Fleming, they have performed in concert at Carnegie Hall, Spain’s Santander Festival and television appearances on Good Morning America, The View and Martha Stewart Living.



Nancianne NANCIANNE PARRELLA, Organist Emerita
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Nancianne Parrella is Organist Emerita of the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in New York City and is active in its extensive music program directed by K. Scott Warren. She plays a prominent part in the acclaimed concert series Sacred Music in a Sacred Space as organ soloist, continuo player, and accompanist for choral and orchestral works. During the recent seasons in New York, she played concerts with Voices of Ascension directed by Dennis Keene; at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine; and with Musica Sacra and Oratorio Society at Carnegie Hall with Kent Tritle conducting. Nancianne and K. Scott Warren have performed together often as duo pianists for many of the leading choral ensembles in New York City.

Nancianne’s signature Organ Plus! recitals, regular audience favorites on the N.P. Mander Organ Recital Series, demonstrate the versatility of the organ in combination with Victoria Drake, harp; Jorge Avila, violin; and Arthur Fiacco, violoncello. In addition to New York City performances, she has brought Organ Plus! to Ohio, New Jersey, Texas, and Long Island.

Nancianne was the founding director of Intermezzo, the chamber music series at the Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston, SC. Her organ performances with orchestra have included: the Saint Saëns Symphony No. 3, “The Organ Symphony” with The Orchestra of St. Ignatius Loyola and the Fort Worth Symphony; Stephen Paulus’ Concerto for Organ, Timpani, Percussion, and Strings at New York’s AGO Regional Convention; and the University of Massachusetts Amherst Symphony Orchestra, which included Poulenc Concerto for Organ, Strings, and Timpani as well.

She also performed with the New York Philharmonic in Lorin Maazel’s farewell concerts of the Britten War Requiem, and recorded it with Kurt Masur conducting; and she has been heard in recent recitals at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine; Methuen Memorial Music Hall; at Trinity Church Wall Street, and at Princeton University Chapel.

Among America’s preeminent choral accompanists, Nancianne is an Emeritus Faculty member of Westminster Choir College of Rider University Princeton, where she was accompanist and assistant director of the famed Westminster Choir and Symphonic Choir directed by Joseph Flummerfelt. She toured and recorded extensively with Westminster Choir in Europe, America, Taiwan, and Korea.

Nancianne was long associated with America’s pioneering choral conductor, Robert Shaw, with whom she toured and recorded in America, France, and Brazil. She has also collaborated with conductors: Kurt Masur, Charles Dutoit, and Lorin Maazel with the NY Philharmonic; Wolfgang Sawallisch of the Philadelphia Orchestra; Zdenek Macal and Neeme Järvi of the NJ Symphony; and James Bagwell and Louis Langreé in New York’s Mostly Mozart Festival.

Her CD labels include MSR; Delos; Gothic; Dorian; Chesky; Telarc, and Teldec. She is featured on two Pheasant Eye DVDs, The Organistas and Creating the Stradivarius of Organs, revealing the development of the N. P. Mander Organ, one of the largest tracker-action organs in New York City.



Robert ReuterROBERT REUTER, Associate Director of Music
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Robert Reuter, conductor, singer, and pianist, was appointed Associate Director of Music in September of 2012 at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in New York City, where he works closely with director K. Scott Warren in contributing and shaping the church’s vibrant liturgical music program and concert series Sacred Music in a Sacred Space

A native of the San Francisco Bay Area, Robert began his involvement in music ministry while in grade school as a member of the church choir. He eventually became accompanist, cantor and choir director at St. Martin of Tours Roman Catholic Parish in San José, California. From 2001-2006, he also served as accompanist for the Santa Clara University Mission Choir, providing music at many of the weekly liturgies at historic Mission Santa Clara de Asís in Santa Clara, California.

Since joining the music staff at St. Ignatius Loyola in 2007, Robert has had the pleasure of working with all of the church’s professional and volunteer ensembles. He currently sings with, and occasionally conducts the 18 voice professional Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola, which offers repertoire at liturgies and concerts ranging from Gregorian chant to the latest choral masterpieces. He is director of the church’s 50-member Parish Community Choir, which can be heard at the annual Christmas and Rejoice in the Lord concerts, as well as many of the major Christmas, Holy Week and Easter liturgies. Robert is director and accompanist for Canticum Sacrum, an advanced volunteer ensemble which offers musical support for the weekly 7:30 Sunday evening liturgies.

In the 2009-2010 season, Robert made his Sacred Music in a Sacred Space concert series debut, conducting the combined choirs and orchestra of St. Ignatius Loyola on Giovanni Gabrieli’s much beloved O Magnum Mysterium in the series’ annual Christmas Concerts.  The following season, he conducted the New York Premiere of Cecilia McDowall’s Christus Natus Est at the Christmas Concerts, as well as an all a cappella concert with Kent Tritle. The a cappella concert was recorded and commercially released in 2011 as Cool of the Day on the MSR label. Highlights from the current season include conductor for Sing We Noel, and Psalms, Hymns & Spiritual Songs concerts.

When not contributing to the musical aspects of Sacred Music in a Sacred Space, Robert enjoys being the behind-the-scenes “go-to-guy” in his position as Technical & Logistics Coordinator. Responsibilities include crafting detailed schematics for each concert, running the lighting and sound systems, and helping to ensure an overall smooth concert experience for the musicians and audience members alike.

Robert is a graduate of Santa Clara University.



Michael SheetzMICHAEL SHEETZ, Music Associate
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Michael Sheetz was appointed Music Associate of the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in September 2012, after having joined the music staff in 2010. He serves as Music Director of the Wallace Hall Choir and Orchestra, Assistant Conductor of the Parish Community Choir, and provides conducting and keyboard support for the acclaimed Sacred Music in a Sacred Space concert series. Further duties include maintaining the church’s renowned music library, as well as contracting, playing, and overseeing many of the church’s liturgies throughout the year. A recording of his playing with the St. Ignatius Children’s Choirs was regarded as “consistently excellent” by the American Record Guide Review, and he recently produced and directed the liturgical music album “Hallelujah: The Wallace Hall Choir and Orchestra,” featuring music in both classical and contemporary styles.

An active musician in New York City, Michael is the Assistant Music Director of Musica Sacra, New York’s longest continuously performing professional chorus. Through this organization Michael assists Music Director Kent Tritle in performances at Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and leads an educational outreach program advocating choral music in underserved New York City public schools. With Musica Sacra he has collaborated with the New York Philharmonic, Orchestra of St. Luke’s and New York City Ballet, and released a recording on the AMR label, “Eternal Reflections: The Choral Music of Robert Paterson.” He made his Musica Sacra conducting debut in March 2014 at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine with Judith Lang Zaimont’s Parable: A Tale of Abram and Isaac.

Michael is the Assistant Conductor and Accompanist of the Fairfield County Chorale in East Norwalk, CT. He is on the faculty of the Berkshire Choral Festival, the United Nations International School, and La Lingua della Lirica, a summer training program for opera singers in Novafeltria, Italy. He has served as a Teaching Fellow at The Juilliard School and as a vocal coach and accompanist at Manhattan School of Music, as well as Assistant Choral Director at the New York Philharmonic, Lincoln Center Festival, and Weill Music Institute. He has performed live broadcasts on WQXR and Vermont Public Radio, and in concert at Weill Hall, Alice Tully Hall, and The Kennedy Center. An accompanist for the Oratorio Society of New York, Voices of Ascension, New York Choral Consortium, Aspen Opera Theatre Center, Middlebury Opera, and the College Light Opera Company, he has collaborated with Philippe Entremont, Alan Gilbert, Jane Glover, Maria Guinand, Pablo Heras-Casado, Dennis Keene, Bernard Labadie, Meredith Monk, John Nelson, Sir Roger Norrington, Emmanuel Plasson, David Rosenmeyer, Steven Schick, Bramwell Tovey, Kent Tritle, and K. Scott Warren.

Michael holds a Master of Music and two Professional Studies degrees from Manhattan School of Music in accompanying and conducting. He is a graduate of Vassar College.



Maureen HaleyMAUREEN HALEY, Director of Children’s Choirs and High School Choir
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Maureen Haley was a member of the professional choir at St. Ignatius for 21 years. An active musician in New York and New Jersey, she accompanies school choruses in the area and teaches voice and piano privately. She is passionate about providing choral experiences for young people. In 2014, Ms. Haley made her conducting debut at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia with the girls and boys of the Pennsylvania Girlchoir and Keystone State Boychoir. She guest lectures at Monmouth University, where she familiarizes future music teachers with the Kodaly methodology. Ms. Haley currently teaches music at The Brearley School.

As a professional singer, Ms. Haley has worked and recorded with musicians such as Michael Tilson Thomas, Kent Tritle, Zubin Mehta, Richard Westenburg, Meredith Monk, Mark Morris, Steve Reich and Robert DeCormier, singing Renaissance through Contemporary and Folk repertoire. She has received critical acclaim in the New York Times.

Ms. Haley received her Bachelor of Arts degree with a concentration in piano from Penn State University, and her Master of Music with a concentration in voice from Queens College, CUNY. She completed her Kodaly certification at Westminster Choir College and James Madison University. A lover of foreign languages, Ms. Haley has pursued post-graduate language studies in Latin, French, Spanish, Hebrew and German.

She is a past New Jersey Symphony Master Teacher, a national conference committee member for the Organization of American Kodaly Educators, and is an officer in the New Jersey state chapter.



Sara MurphySARA MURPHY, Executive Director, Sacred Music in a Sacred Space
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Sara Murphy is Executive Director of Sacred Music in a Sacred Space. In this capacity she manages areas such as advertising, marketing, communication, fulfillment and fundraising for Sacred Music in a Sacred Space.

Sara has been actively involved in liturgical music since beginning in the church choir in grade school, serving as a cantor in high school, and continuing as a choir member and cantor at St. Matthew’s Cathedral in Washington, DC, Sacred Heart Cathedral in Newark, NJ, and here at St. Ignatius Loyola.

From 1998-2011, Sara was a staff member at the Biblical Archaeology Society, publisher of Biblical Archaeology Review magazine, most recently as editor of the society’s award-winning network of web sites and extensive email newsletter program.

Sara is also an active vocal soloist, called “a gorgeous, deep, dark mezzo-soprano” by the New York Times. In October 2016, she will make her company and role debut at Opera Theater of Rome as Ulrica in Verdi’s Un Ballo in Maschera under the baton of Jesús López-Cobos. Current season highlights include two performances at New York City’s Carnegie Hall: A Prayer for Peace with MidAtlantic Opera and Handel’s Messiah with Oratorio Society of New York. Sara appears again with Oratorio Society of New York in Mahler’s Symphony No. 8. Sara returns to Cincinnati May Festival as Emilia in Verdi’s Otello and mezzo-soprano soloist in Mendelssohn’s Elijah.

The recently released recording of Hindemith’s The Long Christmas Dinner on Bridge Records was named one of the “Top Ten Opera Recordings of 2015” in Opera News, and made the top of Arts Beat’s playlist in the New York Times. Additionally, Opera News, The Guardian and Gramophone all praise her portrayal of Mother Bayard and Ermengarde: “Sara Murphy’s closing aria as Ermengarde … is marvellously poignant,” writes Gramophone.

Notable performances in past seasons include the Ligeti Requiem, Schnittke’s Nagasaki and Hindemith’s The Long Christmas Dinner with American Symphony Orchestra conducted by Leon Botstein; Mahler’s Symphony No. 8, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 and Tchaikovsky’s Ode to Joy at Cincinnati May Festival conducted by James Conlon; Elgar’s Dream of Gerontius at Berkshire Choral Festival with conductor Kent Tritle; and Britten’s Phaedra, Barber’s Dover Beach and High Priestess in Verdi’s Aida at Ravinia with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by James Conlon, which received critical acclaim from the Chicago Tribune: “Sara Murphy brought a rich, voluminous mezzo voice, excellent diction and an acute feeling for words and music.”

In recital, Sara has frequently presented Wagner’s Wesendonck Lieder and Mahler’s Rückert Lieder, and her collaborators have included pianist Dalton Baldwin and duo pianists Pascal and Ami Rogé.

Sara earned a bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College and a Master’s degree from Catholic University. Sara was the first-prize winner in the 2013 Oratorio Society of New York Solo Vocal Competition and received an Inter-Cities Performing Arts grant in the same year. In 2010 she was awarded an honorable mention in the George London Foundation Competition, was a finalist in the Joy in Singing Competition, and received a Wagner Society of New York grant.



Danya KatokDANYA KATOK, Music Administrator
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Danya Katok, originally from State College, PA, is Music Administrator of the music department at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola. She also sings regularly with the professional 20-voice Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola, under the direction of K. Scott Warren. In 2016, she received her doctorate in Voice Performance from The CUNY Graduate Center. She taught on the music faculties of Brooklyn College from 2013-2016 and Bronx Community College from 2011-2013. Fluent in Russian, she also teaches Russian diction and has served as diction coach for performances with Collegiate Chorale and Bard Festival Chorale.

As a singer, Danya’s versatility is her greatest strength, described as a “chameleon” by BistroAwards.com. Notable performances include Max in Where the Wild Things Are with New York City Opera (a role for which she was praised by The New York Times as being “superb”), soprano soloist in Mahler’s Symphony No. 4 with Pennsylvania Centre Orchestra, Commère in Thomson’s Four Saints in Three Acts with Mark Morris Dance Group, soprano soloist in Brahms’ Requiem with Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Chamber Choir, the world premiere of O Night Divine at York Theater Company (Off-Broadway), Vaughan Williams’ Serenade to Music with New York Symphonic Arts Ensemble, featured soloist with The Boston Pops in “An Evening of Cole Porter” (“…keep an eye on Katok,” The Boston Globe reported) and her very own cabaret at Don’t Tell Mama.

A two-time Vocal Fellow at Tanglewood Music Center and first-ever New Voices in American Song Fellow at SongFest, Danya has worked closely with song and opera composers, including Libby Larsen, John Musto, Oliver Knussen, and Richard Hundley. She has enjoyed premiering new works by up-and-coming composers, such as Stuart Paul Duncan’s Lament with the Cornell Festival Chamber Orchestra, Michael Strauss’ Sassafras Dawn with members of the Mid-Atlantic Symphony, James Sproul’s October, and David Bridges’ The Hill Wife, a “quartet for two people” where she played the violin and sang. She has received numerous awards in the contemporary music space, including the Phyllis Bryn-Julson Award for 20th/21st Century Music, Tanglewood’s Grace B. Jackson Prize, and the Ernst Bacon Prize for American Art Song. Other awards include Regional Finalist in the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions (Mid-Atlantic region), Winner of the Annual Teaneck Cabaret Competition, and Winner of the Baltimore Music Club Vocal Competition.

Liturgical Music

To download Rejoice in the Lord! Choral Music at the Solemn Mass and Principal Feasts, 2011-2012, at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola,

Click Here

 

Book Club

Watch this space for details on an upcoming Book Club session.

Interparish Religious Education

“Catechesis” or Religious Education is the process of communicating the beliefs, values and practices which make people Catholic Christians. It is the work of handing on, from one generation to the next, the faith that has come down to us and the way of life this faith calls us to embrace.

Growing in the faith is a life-long process that begins in early childhood and continues throughout one’s life. On-going formation in the faith, therefore, is vitally important for every age of life. Our catechetical program assists parents to educate and nurture the faith in their child(ren). For this reason your active participation and involvement play a role that is integral to the program at St. Ignatius.


Here is some important information about our program:

Our program is an on-going formation process ranging from Kindergarten to 8th grade students. This means that there should be no interruption in your child’s religious education. The Sacraments of Eucharist, Reconciliation and Confirmation are received during these years after the completion of required periods of preparation.

Children attend classes each week on either Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday. Classes extend from 4:00 PM-5:30 PM (Monday) for grades 1, 2, 3, 4:15 PM-5:30 PM (Tuesday and Wednesday) for grades K-6, and from 6:00 PM-7:30 PM for grades 7 and 8. Classes for K-6 and 1, 2, 3 are held in St. Ignatius Grammar School (48 East 84 Street) on Tuesday and Wednesday. For grades 7 and 8, classes are held on Tuesday and Wednesday at Loyola School (980 Park Avenue).

We will continue to offer classes at our off-site center at St. Joseph Grammar School on East 87 Street between First and York Avenues for 1st through 3rd Grade. These classes at St. Joseph’s are held on Monday afternoons from 4:00 PM-5:30 PM.

Meetings for parents, especially for new parents, are scheduled throughout the year. Attendance is required for all new parents at a fall orientation session. In addition, periodic evening meetings are scheduled for parents of children preparing to receive the Sacraments of Eucharist, Reconciliation, and Confirmation.

Every Sunday from September to June, at the 9:30 AM Mass in the Church and at the 11:00 AM Wallace Hall Mass, the children process to the Lady Chapel or Loyola Chapel where the Liturgy of the Word is conducted especially for them.

Tuition is $375 per child per year. (Additional fees for first communion and confirmation are not included in this figure.)  We ask you to remit tuition payment before September 30, 2015 or at the time of registration. Financial aid is available for those who demonstrate need. If you wish to pay by installment or request financial aid, you must denote this on the response form in the space provided.

If you need further information or have any questions, please call me at (212) 861-4764 or email me at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). I very much look forward to meeting you and your child(ren).

Sincerely in Christ,
Carly-Anne Gannon, Director




INFORMATION FOR PARENTS
2016-2017

PRIMARY ROLE OF PARENTS

Parents are the primary religious educators of their children. What an awesome responsibility! The role of catechists as religion teachers is to help parents meet their solemn obligation. Our expectation in the Interparish Religious Education Program (IREP), therefore, is that all parents will become immersed with their children in an on-going faith development. Parents are enthusiastically encouraged to set aside time each week to review the chapter which was presented in class. (There are special notes at the end of each chapter.) The focus of each book is its strong scriptural foundation—Bible reading is encouraged. Each book also has a prayer and reference section which is age appropriate and a glossary of important words to be understood.

Parents are encouraged to attend the various prayer services, social events and sacramental celebrations during the year. Your participation in these celebrations fosters a strong community of dedicated parents and strengthens our faith in Jesus as our risen Lord.

CLASS DATES

MONDAY

Grades 1-3: 4:00 - 5:30 pm; classes held in St. Joseph Grammar School.

TUESDAY

Grades K-6: 4:15 - 5:30 pm; classes held in St. Ignatius Grammar School.
Grades 7-8: 6:00 - 7:30 pm; classes held in Loyola School.

WEDNESDAY

Grades K-6: 4:15 - 5:30 pm; classes held in St. Ignatius Grammar School.
Grades 7-8: 6:00 - 7:30 pm; classes held in Loyola School.

The entrance to St. Ignatius Loyola Grammar School is 48 East 84 Street between Park and Madison Avenues (in the middle of the block, on the south side of 84th Street just to the left of McKinnon Hall). The entrance to Loyola School is through the St. Ignatius Loyola Parish House, 980 Park Avenue, between 83rd and 84th Streets on the west side of Park Avenue. St. Joseph Grammar School is located at 420 East 87 Street, between First Avenue and York Avenue.



REGISTRATION

No child will be admitted to class without first being registered.

Students who have registered and have received a Class Location/Teacher Assignment form:
- Grades 1-3 (Monday) go directly to St. Joseph Grammar School
- Grades K-6 go directly to the Grammar School
- Grades 7-8 go to the Parish House

Students who are registered but do not have a Class Location/Teacher assignment form:
- Grades 1-3 (Monday) go directly to St. Joseph Grammar School and look for Ms. Gannon or Mrs. Schneider
- Grades K-6 go directly to the Grammar School and look for Ms. Gannon or Mrs. Schneider
- Grades 7-8 go to the Parish House and look for Ms. Gannon or Mrs. Schneider

There are no waiting areas available at St. Ignatius Loyola Grammar School or at St. Joseph’s. Drop-off on Monday is at 3:55 PM, and 4:10 PM on Tuesday and Wednesday. You will be able to enter the building at 5:20 PM for dismissal. Unfortunately, there is no available space to wait during class time.

On Mondays, dismissal will be from the cafeteria of St. Joseph Grammar School. On Tuesday and Wednesday, the gym (McKinnon Hall) at St. Ignatius will be used for dismissal. We ask all parents/caregivers to wait by the stage area and to be mindful of all announcements.

Some rules apply to our use of the School buildings. No food or beverages are allowed upstairs in any classroom. There is absolutely no gum chewing allowed in the building at any time. Scooters are not to be brought into the building because they represent a hazard to the children.

ATTENDANCE
Faith formation thrives in a stable environment. It is therefore imperative that your child attend classes regularly and on time. Excessive absence will result in the possible retention of a particular grade. If unforeseen circumstances or illness prevent your child from attending a class, please call Carly-Anne Gannon at 212-861-4764 or email to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) before noon of that class day. If this is not possible, please call before the class begins so that we will not need to worry unnecessarily about the whereabouts of your child.

SNOW
The Program will not be in session on days when schools are closed due to a storm or other inclement weather conditions. We ask parents to use their discretion when sending their child(ren) on days of inclement weather.

ACCOUNTABILITY
It is the parents’ responsibility to teach their children the traditional prayers of the Catholic Church - the Hail Mary, Our Father, Glory Be to the Father (primary grades), Act of Contrition, Creed and the responses at Mass. Such knowledge is a necessary part of our faith formation. Parents are strongly encouraged to review these prayers with their children on a regular basis.

For all students in our 7th-8th grade program, a basic facts and information test will be administered. A suitable mastery of religious teaching must be demonstrated in this test in order for a student to continue in this level of the program. For all students, a progress report designed to inform parents of their child’s progress will be sent home in February.

SERVICE PROJECTS
We are challenged to bring God’s love to others by the way we live our lives. God invites even little children to share this challenge. We can make a difference by our response to this call to service. And so this year we continue our involvement with a number of programs: Food Drives throughout the year and the Toy Drive in December that benefits the New York Common Pantry, and finally our Lenten Project - Pennies for Progress. These service projects give our children the opportunity to help those who are less fortunate.

The 8th grade Confirmation candidates will continue their involvement with the Society of St. Vincent de Paul at St. Ignatius. They will prepare and serve meals for the women in our homeless shelter every other Friday beginning in November to the end of April.

SECURITY
Your child’s safety is a major concern to us and if there is any doubt about the identity of the adult coming to pick up your child, we will always err on the side of caution.

A security person will be in attendance at the entrance to St. Joseph and St. Ignatius Loyola Grammar Schools beginning at 4:00 PM and will stay until the end of classes on Mondays (for St. Joseph’s), and Tuesdays and Wednesdays (for St. Ignatius). If your child has a special schedule on a particular day or other unusual circumstances prevail, or if you have a complicated family/caregiver situation that you feel we should be made aware of, please telephone or email Carly-Anne Gannon. If there is sufficient time, please send a written message and follow-up with a telephone call.

We ask that you pick up your child promptly. On Mondays, an adult will stay with any child who has not been picked up. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays, a child not picked up by a responsible adult by 6:00 PM will be escorted to the Parish House, 980 Park Avenue, for delayed pick-up. In either case, if this becomes a continuing problem, a late fee of $20 will be charged each day. Thank you for your cooperation. 

A gentle reminder: Please do not expect a young child (K – 4th grade) to leave the building alone to meet a parent/caregiver in a waiting car. This is not a safe practice and, for safety considerations, we cannot permit it.

If you move during the school year, please notify us of the necessary changes in address and telephone number.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
You will be receiving the calendar of events for the academic year. This calendar lists all scheduled events, though minor changes or additions may be necessary at a later date. You will be notified in advance of these changes. We will also send email updates to the calendar and reminders every month.

LITURGICAL SERVICES
Liturgical services are the occasions when we come together to pray as a community. They represent an important dimension of our Program and parents are strongly encouraged to attend these services. Our liturgies on Sunday are at 9:30 AM in the Church and 11:00 AM in Wallace Hall. A separate Children’s Liturgy of the Word is offered at the 9:30 AM Mass. The Children’s Liturgy of the Word is designed to help the children more fully engage with the Liturgy of the Word during Mass. 

Parents’ attendance at the special preparation meetings and prayer services for First Communion, First Reconciliation, Confirmation and Family Faith Formation sessions are extremely important. Attendance at these meetings is obligatory for parents. For a child can fully appreciate and enter into the sacramental celebration only if the child’s primary teacher, that is the parent, is actively involved in the preparation process. In fairness to the child, therefore, we may need to delay the child’s reception of the sacrament in order to give the child more time to make up for the parents’ lack of involvement.

FINANCES
The Interparish Religious Education Program held at St. Ignatius and St. Joseph is a joint effort of the parishes on the East Side of Manhattan to provide quality religious education to their parishioners. We apply no geographical restrictions to families who wish their children to participate in the Program.

The Program, therefore, in order to provide quality education, must be financially self-sufficient. The tuition charge is based on the real out-of-pocket cost of the Program’s services. (The Program is not charged for the use of parish and school facilities and other resources at St. Ignatius or St. Joseph.) Though some financial assistance is available to families, we ask every parent to support the Program financially to ensure that the Program can meet its expenses.

To receive financial aid, a parent must fill out an application form at the time of registration. Requests for aid are granted only on a yearly basis. We ask those families who can do so to contribute financially even beyond the tuition payment so that we can offer some financial assistance to needy families who want their children to learn the saving truth of Jesus Christ.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Parents have often requested a reference for professional psychological services either for themselves or for their children when they are experiencing difficulties and some assistance seems called for. We highly recommend:
Kenwood Psychological Services
David M. Kelley, Ph.D., Director
124 East 84 Street, Suite 1D
New York, NY 10028
212-744-2121

Dr. Kelley takes great care in selecting an appropriate therapist or counselor to meet the needs and requirements of each person requesting assistance.

Join Our Choirs

Join us! Details on each of our choirs are listed below. Please contact the staff member listed with any questions and to schedule an audition.

CHILDREN’S CHOIRS

To donate or make a registration payment, click here.

Participants in the Children’s Choirs rehearse weekly during the school year, and participate in Sunday liturgies, the Christmas Eve Family Mass, the annual Christmas Concerts and the spring Rejoice in the Lord! concert. They also participate in other special liturgies and events such as the Pueri Cantores Regional Children’s Choral Festival, hosted by St. Ignatius Loyola last season, MIX IT UP with a visiting Children’s Choir, nursing home visits, and the annual choir competition.

Children receive training in the art of singing, reading music, and the fundamentals of music theory. Through their hard work and dedication, not only will choristers develop a passionate commitment to excellence through the choral art, but they will also learn self-discipline, confidence, and the importance of giving back to their church and community through the gift of music.

Informal auditions take place in the spring and by appointment in the fall. All the St. Ignatius Loyola Children’s Choirs are directed by Maureen Haley.
Contact: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Training Choir I (Grades 1-3)
Rehearsals: Wednesdays, 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM
September-June

This choir is open to younger children (generally grades 1-2) with little or no previous musical experience. Children develop a healthy beginning vocal technique, gain familiarity with the liturgy, and focus on the fundamentals of reading music.


Training Choir II (Grades 3-5)
Rehearsals: Wednesdays, 3:15 PM-4:15 PM
September-June

This choir is open to children (generally grades 3-4) who may have at least one year of experience in Training Choir I, or previous musical experience. Children in this choir continue developing healthy vocal technique, music reading skills, and liturgical familiarity.


Middle School Choir (Grades 5-8)
Rehearsals: Thursdays, 4:15 PM-5:45 PM
September-June

This choir is open to 5th-8th graders (boys must have unchanged voices) who have previous music experience and exhibit the maturity required for a longer, more demanding rehearsal. Highlights of past seasons include performances for the Sacred Music in a Sacred Space concert series in Handel’s Messiah, Bach’s Christmas Oratorio, a world premiere of an opera, and a televised appearance on Good Day NY. This season includes a festival day at Cathedral at St. John the Divine. 

 


ADULT CHOIRS

Parish Community Choir (PCC)
Rehearsals: Tuesdays, 7 PM-9 PM
September-May

The Parish Community Choir ministers to the St. Ignatius congregation at parish Masses throughout the year and also participates in the annual Christmas concerts and spring Rejoice in the Lord! concert. Directed by Robert Reuter, this diverse choir of 40-50 singers explores various styles of sacred music and focuses on voice training and the development of musicianship. Members also sell tickets to our annual Christmas concerts and usher at Sacred Music in a Sacred Space concerts throughout the year. All are welcome to audition.
Contact: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)


Canticum Sacrum (CS)
Rehearsals: Sundays, 6 PM-7:30 PM
September-June

This ensemble ministers weekly at the 7:30 PM Sunday evening Mass, September through early June, and, throughout the year, joins forces with the Parish Community Choir and Wallace Hall Choir to provide music at other select liturgies such as Christmas Eve and the spring Rejoice in the Lord! concert. Directed by Robert Reuter, CS sings a blend of contemporary Catholic hymns, traditional hymns, and anthems. Singers with previous experience in a small choral setting are welcome to audition. At auditions, singers are asked to sight sing and vocalize. 
Contact: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)


Wallace Hall Choir and Orchestra
Rehearsals: Sundays, 9:45 AM-10:45 AM
September-June

The Wallace Hall Choir and Orchestra ministers weekly at the 11 AM Wallace Hall Family Mass from September through June. The group also participates in Christmas Eve and Ash Wednesday liturgies and the spring Rejoice in the Lord! concert. This ensemble emphasizes the pastoral role of music in liturgy while working to deepen its understanding of choral and instrumental musicianship. Directed by Michael Sheetz, the Wallace Hall Choir and Orchestra encompasses a wide variety of age groups and musical styles. All are welcome to audition.
Contact: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)


The Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola
Hailed by the New York Times as “a finely polished, stylistically nimble ensemble,” the Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola is comprised of New York’s finest professional singers. The core group of 17 members sings a demanding schedule of weekly parish worship services in a wide range of repertoire, with particular emphasis on new works, the sacred Renaissance repertoire, and Gregorian chant. The choir expands as required for the
Sacred Music in a Sacred Space Concert Series. Each member is a soloist in his or her own right in a variety of genres including early music, opera, oratorio, and contemporary repertoire. The Choir may be heard on recordings for the MSR Classics and AMDG labels. To express interest in joining the Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola, experienced professional singers with advanced degrees in voice performance or commensurate experience should send resumes and sound clips to the email below. Auditions are held as needed.
Contact: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The Grammar School

The Saint Ignatius Loyola Grammar School, located at 48 East 84th Street, has its own website.

You may visit the Grammar School here!

Music

Our music program is renowned for its excellence and broad scope. In over 400 liturgies each year, our communal voice is raised to God in prayer and thanksgiving. 

Our critically acclaimed Sacred Music in a Sacred Space concert series serves as an outreach to the community at over 12 concerts per year.

Whatever your musical or liturgical preference, we invite you to join us, and trust that you and your family will find a spiritual home with us.

We offer music at all of our weekend Masses.

September-June

Saturday at 5:30 PM — cantor and organ; traditional
Sunday at 8:00 AM — organ; traditional
Sunday at 9:30 AM — cantor and organ; traditional
Sunday at 11:00 AM/Family Mass in Wallace Hall — cantor, piano, Wallace Hall choir, percussion, and instruments; contemporary
Sunday at 11:00 AM/Solemn Mass in the church — cantor, organ, and the professional Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola; traditional, including Gregorian Chant
Sunday at 7:30 PM — cantor, piano, Canticum Sacrum, organ, and percussion; blended contemporary and traditional

Summer (June-August)

Saturday at 5:30 PM — cantor and organ; traditional
Sunday at 8:00 AM —  cantor and organ; traditional
Sunday at 9:30 AM — cantor and organ; traditional
Sunday at 11:00 AM/Family Mass in Wallace Hall — on hiatus; Mass and choir resumes in September.
Sunday at 11:00 AM/Solemn Mass in the church — cantor and organ; traditional — choir resumes in September.
Sunday at 7:30 PM — cantor and organ; traditional and contemporary; choir resumes in September.

 

Outreach

As a faith community in the Ignatian Jesuit tradition, we are especially mindful of our neighbors in need. We both practice hands-on charity and care for the sick and needy and advocacy against unjust structures in our society which oppress the poor and militate for war. In all of our outreach activities we collaborate with other Christian Churches and non-Christian Religious Congregations on the upper East Side of Manhattan and beyond.

Education

Education on every level is a cornerstone of the Jesuit tradition.  St. Ignatius Loyola is proud to offer exceptional educational opportunities for children of all ages.  Beginning with children from two to five years old, the Day Nursery provides young children with a challenging preschool program emphasizing creative play, social interactions, and cognitive skills.  Students at the Grammar School, serving kindergarten through eighth grade, receive a balanced education emphasizing the spiritual, intellectual, and social development of the individual.  For students enrolled in other public or private schools, the parish also offers a comprehensive Interparish Religious Education program that continues the on-going faith formation process and guides children as they prepare to receive the sacraments of Eucharist, Reconciliation, and Confirmation.

Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA)

Would you like to become Catholic?

Were you baptized as a Roman Catholic and never received First Communion or Confirmation?

Do you have a friend or family member who may be interested in inquiring into Catholic faith?

For further information please email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call the Parish House at or call at 212-288-3588


We have the privilege at St. Ignatius of welcoming many guests and visitors. We especially welcome those who may be thinking about becoming Catholic.

The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) is the ordinary way the Church reaches out to adults who inquire into the Catholic faith. Since the beginning of the Church, adults have been welcomed into the Church through baptism after a period of instruction, prayer, and reflection. We at St. Ignatius Loyola are continuing this tradition. 

If you feel drawn to the Catholic faith, we invite you to join us! Participants inquire into the Catholic faith, come to know Jesus through the Gospels, pray and prepare for the Easter Sacraments. This process is also open to Catholic adults who have not received the Sacraments of First Communion or Confirmation.

The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults includes formation, prayer and liturgical rites and is a vital part of the parish and the universal Church. There are several stages in the process and each phase recognizes that every Christian life is, in fact, a journey.

Although the conversion journey begins formally when the RCIA inquirers and the parish team first begin meeting, the real conversion journey starts much earlier in people’s hearts. God calls all of us by name. The appeal of Christ’s fundamental message is ongoing and is experienced by a diverse group.

Here are some comments from those who have become Catholic:

After high school, art school exposed me to all variety of contemporary secular thought and I drank it in. Soon it was the 90s when the so-called New Atheists were on the rise. I read all of their books as fast as I could get them. I also read books of scripture scholarship in order to prepare myself to debate believers. Once in a while, though, an undeniable beauty would glimmer from these readings, momentarily piercing my certainty. I saw only later that Christ was always quietly but tenaciously holding my attention.

There was no shattering event or obvious turning point, though there were a number of shining influences – individuals, ideas, texts – along the way. The materialist philosophy that I had been touting for my entire adult life gradually began to feel inadequate and superficial. Then there were, here and there, fleeting moments of wonder, of a sudden staggering awareness of the immeasurable, inexplicable gratuitousness of being. Four years ago, I was baptized here at St Ignatius Loyola, followed two years later by my wife, and just months after that by our two daughters.
– Philip Lauer

Many seasons of my life turned before I was ready to enter the Catholic Church. For years I sat in the pews of parishes I loved while moving around the country, and in them I always experienced great peace. However, I wasn’t prepared to move forward in faith. I did not anticipate that St. Ignatius would inspire such movement in my soul! In unknowing preparation for the RCIA process, I was befriended and loved by the Ignatian Young Adults. They inspired me to question the key items hindering me from pursuing Catholicism more fully. Through these many months I have learned much; the more I’ve learned, the more I’ve come to accept that many questions must be satisfied by faith alone. This is my greatest joy—to have found a community where my simple faith can be strengthened! I’ve cried many tears at Mass at St. Ignatius; the Holy Spirit is alive and well here.
– Trysha Daskam

One hot summer day, I found myself standing in front of St. Ignatius Loyola. The doors were wide open. I wasn’t sure if I was allowed to enter, but I went inside anyway. When I walked in, I was overwhelmed by how beautiful the church was. Someone was practicing the organ, and I sat in a pew to listen. I closed my eyes, and felt myself rocking from side to side. I mumbled a prayer lower than a whisper. An amazing thing happened. I felt completely calm. An unfamiliar stillness and sense of peace fell over me. In that moment, I knew I had to come back to this place. I began visiting almost every day to pray, and later, started attending Mass. When I started the RCIA process, I was able to rest in the peace of God. I have found a great community at St. Ignatius Loyola, and found abundant opportunities to become stronger in my faith.
– A. Grier

As I reflect on my year of conversion, I also think about the love and support that I felt from the St. Ignatius community and RCIA team, from the Parish, as well as relationships developed through the Grammar School and the Day Nursery. I was encouraged by others who had committed to the Church as adults, buoyed by their excitement and enthusiasm as they spoke about their own conversion experiences and how they showed their support for my journey.

I found myself thanking God for the special moments in my everyday life—an unexpected moment of kindness between my sons or a beautiful sunrise during a brisk morning run in Central Park—and asking Him for guidance with challenges big and small.

I truly felt God’s embrace all around me, culminating at the moving Easter Vigil liturgy. Deepened faith and unity for my family continues to encapsulate so much of what I seek from the Church. My family looks forward to another exciting year in the Church as our second son prepares for his First Holy Communion next spring. I realize RCIA was just the beginning of my new life as a Catholic, but what an important and amazing beginning it was. St. Ignatius is a special community and I feel truly blessed to be a part of it.
– Arjay Jensen

The power of God and His mission resides not in the bricks and mortar, but in our Parish through the priests, staff, cantors, musicians, volunteers, the devoted custodians, and the outreach of the parishioners. “For just as in one body we have many members, yet all the members have not the same function, so we, though many, are one body in Christ” (Romans 12:4-5). We see ourselves as Roman Catholics in progress. Where do we go from here? Our journey has only begun. We are grateful for God’s love, ever mindful of our weaknesses, striving to be better servants, and grateful for every day God gives us.
– Suzanne and Howard Feldman

The RCIA environment was loving, open-minded, and down to earth. We became a community and it felt safe to ask any kind of question. Looking back, I can see I was falling in love: with God, with the world, and with life. It was as though I had come home to a place I didn’t know was waiting for me. By the time I participated in the Rite of Welcome, I had yet to get all my objections answered. But I knew enough to allow God to figure out the rest. More than anything else, I longed to know Jesus Christ more intimately. My challenge to God to overcome each one of my objections slowly turned into God’s invitation to turn myself in, to give myself up. That this invitation had been extended to me the whole of my life still strikes me as miraculous.
– Skye Christina Angioletti

One evening, I found myself sitting in a pew, gazing up at a face and a symbol that had been following me since as far back as my memory allowed. I wasn’t brought up with religion, and I had hardly spent much time in a church. But I felt that I had never needed God more. The next evening, I came back. And the evening after that, I came back again. A pattern started to develop (which was unusual for a man who had been raised a skeptic!), and as part of that pattern I committed myself to learning more about the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

From the day I set foot in St. Ignatius Loyola to participate in the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults, it was clear that I had found my place. It could not have come at a better time, and the parish community could not have been more welcoming. As one version of me faded, a new one took its place. Guided in my learning and blessed with the camaraderie of my fellow catechumens (those preparing for Baptism, Confirmation, and First Eucharist), I was baptized at the Easter Vigil and commenced my life as a Catholic.
– Emir Senturk

I will treasure my RCIA journey, my Baptism, First Communion, and Confirmation as some of the most meaningful moments of my life. My husband and I were married on June 6, 2015 at St. Ignatius Loyola, and as the cantor sang Ave Maria I realized that the Holy Spirit was with us. Today I feel so blessed to be a part of the St. Ignatius family, I am honored to be a Catholic, and am eager to continue to learn and welcome God into my life every day. In retrospect, I realize that God has been with me my entire life, but was just waiting for me to be ready. I hope you all enjoy your journey as much as I have.
– Fahimeh Sasan


Entering the Catholic Church has brought with it the many joys and consolations of Catholic life, but just as certainly, it has left me to meditate upon our faith’s many mysteries and to grapple with the challenges and obligations it places upon us. That’s why for me and, I believe, for us as a Parish community and as part of the universal church, the Rites leading up to becoming Catholic are so valuable, and why those participating in it should energize and inspire us. For in witnessing this milestone on their spiritual path, we are explicitly recognizing that every Christian life is, in fact, a journey.

These seekers boldly embrace the wondering, seeking and struggling that are the hallmarks of any journey and the inescapable realities of faith. And in so doing, they are reminding cradle Catholics and converts alike that the transformation of ourselves and our community actually depends on every one of us embracing, with the help of God’s grace, those realities. If not for Christ, that challenge, with its missteps and frustrations assured, might feel too daunting.
– Doug Mehagian

I decided to seek admission to the Catholic Church after attending a three-hour Good Friday Service at St. Ignatius Loyola in 2016. I was profoundly moved by the ecumenical nature of the service; the meditations were led by ministers of different denominations. I was also encouraged to join RCIA by friends whose sons attend Loyola School and serve as altar servers at the Parish. The program was thorough and ably conducted by a dedicated team who guided us with incredible understanding and patience through to the glorious moments of Baptism, Confirmation, First Eucharist and Reception at the Easter Vigil. There were 23 of us who had not known each other. At the end, the love and support among us was tangible; no longer strangers, but brothers and sisters in the Risen Christ. The reception by the Parish will remain an everlasting joy!–  Wylton James


For further information please email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call the Parish House at or call at 212-288-3588

Spiritual Direction

As a Jesuit Parish, we offer the Ministry of Individual Spiritual Direction as well as Group Spiritual Direction to those wishing to deepen their relationship with God and their experience of prayer.

Please contact Fr. Brett McLaughlin at 212-288-3588 or by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for more information.

Funerals

The death of a loved one, whose life has been a major part of our own, can be a soul-wrenching experience. We need help to find ways to carry on with our lives.

The Catholic Church has sacred rituals that help us deal with the death of a loved one. These rituals, by invoking our Christian faith, give due honor to the deceased and also bring comfort to those who grieve.

The principal Catholic ritual on behalf of the deceased is the Funeral Mass, which concludes with the prayers of Final Commendation.

Why is the Funeral Mass so important?
Central to our faith is the proclamation that Jesus suffered, died, was buried, and rose from the dead. He passed through death into eternal glory with God the Father and the Holy Spirit. We firmly believe that all who are baptized in Jesus and profess faith in him by word and deed are claimed by him. Whether in life or death, we belong to Christ. Death is not the final word for us. We reaffirm these truths at every Eucharist and in particular at the Funeral Mass.

These truths of our faith can give us hope and consolation in the face of death, but we cannot deny the grief we feel at the loss of someone we love. Even Jesus wept at the death of his friend Lazarus. Through the wake, funeral Mass, and final commendation, our sadness and grief are tempered by our confidence that the one we love now rests in the peace of Jesus Christ.

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS
Inform the Funeral Home Director of your intention to have a Funeral Mass for your loved one. They will contact the Parish to arrange the details.

Memorial Mass 
If it is not possible to have the body or cremated remains present, a Memorial Mass can be arranged.                                                                                                           

The Wake Service
A priest from the Parish will come to the wake, normally on the last evening, to offer a brief prayer service to commend the deceased to God.

The Cemetery
Graveside services are normally provided by the cemetery staff. The funeral home director will assist you in this. A priest from the parish is normally not available to go to the cemetery.

Music at the Liturgy
All music at a Funeral Mass must be of a sacred character and reflect our belief in the saving power of Jesus Christ and the mercy and compassion of God. The parish Director of Music determines the appropriateness of any requests for special pieces of music.

An organist and cantor are provided for each Funeral Mass. Arrangements for other musicians or singers must be made through the Music Department and entails additional cost. Please .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call the Music Department Administrator at 212-288-3588.

Flowers
The funeral director will normally be allowed to bring floral arrangements into the church. Please check with the priest celebrant or the church sacristan as to their number and suitable placement. Large wreaths on stands are not allowed in the church.

Confirmation

Sacrament of Confirmation – St. Ignatius offers a seven-week course to prepare for the confirmation of Baptized Catholic adults who have received First Eucharist. This course is offered every spring, shortly before the bishop comes to our Parish to confirm eighth graders in our parochial school.

If you are an adult who is not a Roman Catholic, and if you are interested in more information about becoming a Roman Catholic, you should consider participating in our Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults program. Through this process, an adult is Baptized, Confirmed and receives Eucharist in the Catholic Church.

For more information about this Rite, leave a message for Maureen Fullam at the Parish House (212-288-3588).

Calling for information in no way obligates the caller. In fact, the process itself is deliberately structured to allow one to inquire about the Church and to proceed only if he or she is comfortable with such a decision and wishes to do so.

 

Marriage

The Vocation of Marriage is the divine call to show forth the love of God for the world in the love of husband and wife for each other.

The bride and the groom at the wedding are themselves the “ministers” of this sacrament. For Roman Catholics, a priest or deacon must witness the marriage with two other witnesses (normally the best man and maid of honor).

The Church imposes numerous requirements on a couple to marry validly because the commitment of married love is so important for the couple and plays such an integral role in the sacramental life of the Church. Thus, an extensive pre-marital preparation program is in place, which normally requires at least six months to complete.

If you wish to celebrate your wedding at St. Ignatius, contact Maureen Haley at the Parish House (212-288-3588 x636) as soon as possible after your engagement and certainly before any plans are made about a reception or other arrangements.

If you plan to celebrate your wedding somewhere other than St. Ignatius, the Parish can offer pastoral assistance to you, if necessary, with your preparation and meeting the Church requirements.

Eucharist

Jesus was a genius! He not only taught us that love of God and neighbor are equally important, he gave us a revolutionary way to combine the two. He made the universal sign of human friendship and love – a meal together – the sign as well of our love for God. Just as a Thanksgiving Day dinner is our American way of giving thanks to God and one another for all the good we share, so too our Eucharist is our universal Catholic way of giving thanks to God for the love we share and bring to our world.

From the moment of our baptism, we are members of the People of God. Therefore we do not come to give thanks to God as isolated individuals practicing personal devotions. We come as a People who worship God in ritual words and actions that “sacramentalize,” give external expression to, our deepest beliefs and desires. It is most appropriate, then, to join actively in all of the prayers, songs and gestures that compose our communal worship of God. The liturgy calls us to participation rather than to a privatized silence.

We are accustomed to arriving some minutes before important theatrical performances because we know we will not be allowed to disturb others by being seated during the performance and we don’t want to “miss anything.” Our worship of God is surely more important than a play or opera. Our fellow worshipers deserve our respect as well. Arrive some minutes before our worship begins. Give yourself a chance to reflect on what it is we are about to do. Similarly, we dress in different ways for different occasions. Our dressing for worship should reflect the respect we have for God and one another. Food or drink, chewing gum, cell phones and beepers going off – these show disrespect for the importance of the occasion.

Although infants and young children are seldom brought to the theater, it is quite appropriate for families to worship God together. When an infant or toddler creates a disturbance, however, please respect your fellow worshipers by taking your child into the vestibule until he or she calms down. Young children learn proper decorum in classrooms; so too they can be encouraged to enter into the ritual prayers and actions at Mass and especially the songs. Remember to teach by example!

Our prayer together is divided into two equally important parts, the Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist. We begin with a song that gathers our thoughts into focus and we pause to open our hearts to being reconciled with God and one another. On Sundays and feast days we sing praise to God, Father, Son and Spirit. Our priest presider gives voice to our communal prayer of worship and petition. Our resounding “Amen” says, “Yes, this is indeed our worship and our petition.”

Next we have the opportunity to listen attentively to God speaking to us through the Scriptures and to respond to God’s word through the Responsorial Psalm and the Gospel Acclamation. The homily applies God’s word to our daily lives. The creed is our communal voicing of those beliefs that bind us together. Our Prayer of the Faithful places our needs and those of our world before our loving God. All of these moments are significant. Active participation is vital.

Members of our community bring forward our gifts of bread and wine for which we give thanks to God and give God praise: “Blessed be God forever!” Now our sacred banquet is ready to begin.

Our meal is set in the context of prayers and acclamations that recall God’s loving deeds on our behalf, culminating in the death and resurrection of Jesus. In the course of this great Eucharistic Prayer, we invoke the power of the Holy Spirit to transform these gifts of bread and wine into the body and blood of Jesus. We then ask the Spirit to enable us, God’s People, who are nourished by the body and blood of the Lord, truly to become “one body, one spirit, in Christ.” Together we respond with the Great Amen.

We pray the Lord’s Prayer and then give expression to our true feelings toward one another, family, friends and strangers alike: “Peace be with you!” In this spirit of love and friendship, we approach the Table of the Lord to eat and drink together.

The Church encourages us to show a sign of reverence as we receive both the body and the blood of Christ. This is best done by a slight bow of the head and shoulders while the person in front of you is receiving. Please do not genuflect, since this can be a danger to the person behind you and also draws unnecessary attention to yourself rather than to the Eucharist.

If you choose to receive the host in your hand, please do not grab at it with your fingers. Place your open hands, chest high, one on top of the other. The minister will raise the host and say, “The body of Christ.” You respond, “Amen.” The minister will then place the host in your palm. With your other hand, place the host in your mouth and consume it. Then proceed to receive from the cup.

If you choose to receive on your tongue, keep your hands folded as the minister says, “The body of Christ.” Respond, “Amen.” Then open your mouth and extend your tongue so that the minister can easily place the host. Consume the host and proceed to receive from the cup.

The minister of the cup will raise the cup slightly and say, “The blood of Christ.” Respond, “Amen.” Then take the cup with both hands, sip from it, and return it to the minister.

Once you have received communion, please do not leave the church! We’re not done yet!

Oftentimes, this is when parish announcements are made. These are important because they inform all of us of how our community is gathering at other times and places in order to grow in our faith and be of service to our world.

We then offer a final prayer of thanks to God and receive God’s blessing as we are sent forth into our world to “love and serve the Lord and one another.” We end our celebration with a final song together as our priest and ministers process out of the church. When we finish singing, we too leave, nourished now to be living sacraments, clear visible signs of the presence of the Lord in our world. “Thanks be to God!”

Language is important. If we say we’re “going to Mass,” we’re very likely implying that we’ll sit and kneel and stand in church while the priest “says Mass” up at the altar. If we say we’re “celebrating the Eucharist,” we’re declaring that we are joining with the community in giving praise and thanks to God by actively participating as we hear God’s word, receive the body and blood of God’s Son, and are missioned as God’s People.

Ritual, by its very nature, is repetitive. Repetition can enable us very often to readily participate in praying and singing. Repetition can, however, turn ritual into mere routine. Praying the same words, using the same gestures, singing the same songs can slowly drain them of real meaning for us and no longer allow them to be an authentic expression of our deepest beliefs. Good liturgy is hard work – on the part of the presider, the ministers, and all of us who participate. But it is truly worth the effort. Good liturgy transforms and enlivens all of us and sends us with genuinely renewed vigor into the opportunities and challenges of our daily lives.

Reconciliation

The Sacrament of Reconciliation is an experience of God’s forgiving love that not only absolves us from past failures but, more importantly, provides God an opportunity to gift us with grace to make better choices in our future. This sacrament also provides an individual with an opportunity, in absolute confidentiality, to discuss particular areas of personal concern with a priest.

The sacrament is available every Saturday from 4:30 PM to 5:00 PM in the confessional booth at the back of the Church. An individual may also call the Parish House to make an appointment to speak with a priest.

A Parish Reconciliation Service is celebrated in the church during Advent and in Lent.

Liturgical Ministries

Download Handbook for Liturgical Ministers
Download Handbook for Altar Servers


Lay ministers play an essential role in the liturgical celebrations of the Parish.
We rely heavily on the consistent, dedicated, and prayerful service of parishioners who answer God’s call to assist the community in worship.

Parishioners are always needed to serve in the following roles:

  • Lectors
  • Eucharistic Ministers
  • Altar Servers
  • Ushers/Ministers of Hospitality

Training is provided.

- Lectors proclaim the scripture, lead the Prayers of the Faithful, and make the Parish announcements.

- Eucharistic Ministers assist with distributing Communion under both species.

- Altar Servers assist the presider during liturgical celebrations.

- Ushers/Ministers of Hospitality welcome people to the liturgy, distribute song sheets, assist with taking up the collection(s), usher at Communion time, and distribute Parish bulletins as people leave the Church.

Please contact Teresa Cariño at 212-288-3588 for more information about serving as:

  • Usher/Minister of Hospitality
  • Lector
  • Eucharistic Minister to the homebound
  • Eucharistic Minister at Mass
  • Altar Server

Links

OTHER CATHOLIC RESOURCES

We are making every effort to provide you with current and relevant resources through links to Catholic and Jesuit websites. Please .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) if you have difficulties accessing these sites.

USA Northeast Province of the Society of Jesus
http://www.jesuitseast.org/

Jesuits USA
http://www.jesuits.org

Jesuit Vocations
http://www.jesuitvocations.org/

Office of Ignatian Spirituality - Maryland and USA Northeast Provinces of the Society of Jesus
http://www.jesuit-collaborative.org/

New York State Catholic Conference
http://www.nyscatholic.org

The Holy See
http://w2.vatican.va/content/vatican/en.html

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops
http://www.usccb.org

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: Department of Justice, Peace and Human Development
http://www.usccb.org/about/justice-peace-and-human-development/

Sacred Space: Daily Online Prayer (Sponsored by the Irish Jesuits)
http://sacredspace.ie

Ignatian Volunteer Corps
http://www.ivcusa.org

Catholic New York
http://www.cny.org

Center for Christian-Jewish Learning
http://www.bc.edu/research/cjl/

America Magazine
http://www.americamagazine.org

Contact Us

Parish Staff


NameTitleEmail Address
Fr. Dennis J. Yesalonia, S.J.Pastor.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Fr. Michael P. Hilbert, S.J.Associate Pastor.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Fr. Brian G. Konzman, S.J.Associate Pastor.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Fr. Brett B. McLaughlin, S.J.Assistant Pastor.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Fr. William J. Bergen, S.J.Senior Priest.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Teresa Marie Cariño Pastoral Associate.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Carly-Anne GannonDirector of Religious Education/Pastoral Associate.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
K. Scott WarrenDirector of Music.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Fernando CastroTreasurer.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Daniel BeckwithPrincipal Organist.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Maureen HaleyDirector of Children’s Choirs/Pastoral Assistant.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Danya KatokMusic Administrator.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Sara MurphyExecutive Director, Sacred Music in a Sacred Space.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Robert ReuterAssociate Director of Music.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Michael SheetzMusic Associate.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Diane BoyleAssistant to the Pastor.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Patricia SchneiderAdministrative Assistant.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Elizabeth O’SullivanCommunications Coordinator.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Caroline FernandesEvents Coordinator.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 



Rev. Dennis J. Yesalonia S.J. Rev. Dennis J. Yesalonia, S.J., Pastor

Father Dennis Yesalonia is a native of Jersey City, New Jersey. He entered the Society of Jesus in Boston, Massachusetts in 1976 and was ordained a priest at St. Joseph Chapel at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1985.

No stranger to New York City, Father Yesalonia is a 1967 graduate of Xavier High School. He journeyed to New England to attend the College of the Holy Cross and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science in 1971. He holds a Juris Doctor degree from Notre Dame Law School where he distinguished himself as a Concannon Scholar. Father Yesalonia has been a member of the bar of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1975 and of the U.S. Supreme Court since 1988. After entering the Society of Jesus, Father Yesalonia earned a master’s degree in philosophy from Fordham University, a bachelor of sacred theology degree from Regis College in Toronto, and a master of divinity degree from the University of Toronto.

Following his ordination to the priesthood, Father Yesalonia served as legal counsel to Boston College for thirteen years and taught a seminar on estate planning at its law school. After an interim period in private practice, he returned to academia as legal counsel to the College of the Holy Cross until 2003. In 2002, Father Yesalonia was named treasurer of the New England Province of the Society of Jesus. After a term of eleven years as treasurer, he served as chief operating officer of the Health Sciences Division of Loyola University Chicago before briefly returning to the provincial staff of the New England Province until the summer of 2015.

Throughout his many years in legal and financial administration at Jesuit institutions, Father Yesalonia regularly served on weekends as an Assisting Priest at parishes in the archdioceses of Boston and Chicago and the diocese of Worcester.

Father Yesalonia joined the parish staff in September 2015. He became Pastor in June 2016.



Rev. Michael P. Hilbert, S.J. Rev. Michael P. Hilbert, S.J., Associate Pastor

Father Michael Hilbert, S.J. grew up in White Plains, New York. He joined the Jesuits in 1973 and was ordained a priest in 1983, at the Fordham University Church. He pronounced final vows in 1991 in Rome.

Father Hilbert is a 1969 graduate of Fordham Preparatory School. He went to Colgate University in Hamilton, New York where he had a double major in international relations and German. He spent his junior year in Freiburg, Germany and graduated from Colgate in 1973.

Father Hilbert spent his early years as a Jesuit in Asia, teaching in the Philippines and studying Mandarin in Taiwan. His theology studies were undertaken in Rome, where he earned the Bachelor of Sacred Theology degree from the Gregorian University. He went on to specialize in Canon Law, receiving his doctorate with honors in 1990.

Missioned to teach procedural canon law at the Gregorian, Father Hilbert directed a program for the training of ecclesiastical judges, was Academic Vice-President of the university, and Dean of the Canon Law Faculty. Most recently he was President of the Fondazione La Gregoriana in Rome and is on the Board of The Gregorian University Foundation here in New York. During his years in Rome, he was Spiritual Director at a seminary and judge on various church tribunals. 

Father Hilbert joined the parish staff in October 2014.



Rev. Brian G. Konzman, S.J. Rev. Brian G. Konzman, S.J., Associate Pastor

Father Brian Konzman, S.J., grew up in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Fr. Konzman graduated from Scranton Preparatory School and the University of Scranton, where he got to know the Jesuits well. As an undergraduate, he majored in chemistry and philosophy.

He entered the Jesuit novitiate in Syracuse, New York, directly after graduation in 2008. In 2010, he enrolled at Fordham University in New York City, earning a master’s degree in philosophy. He was missioned to Gonzaga College High School in 2013 for two years, teaching computer science, serving as director of worship, coaching cross-country, and ministering as chaplain for the swim, dive and baseball teams. From 2012 to 2015, he was a managing editor and writer at The Jesuit Post, a website dedicated to faith-based commentary targeting young adults. Next, he completed a master of divinity degree at the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University in Berkeley, California.

Ordained a deacon in October 2017, he served at Newman Hall-Holy Spirit Parish, the Newman Center at the University of California, Berkeley, and as a chaplain for Cal’s rugby team. His Jesuit formation has included summers in China studying Mandarin, in Nicaragua studying Spanish, and in Wernersville, Pennsylvania, working as a spiritual director.

Father Konzman joined the parish staff in June 2018.



Rev. Brett B. McLaughlin, S.J. Rev. Brett B. McLaughlin, S.J., Assistant Pastor

Father Brett McLaughlin, S.J. lived in western Massachusetts, Tennessee and Rochester while growing up. He first started thinking about a vocation to the priesthood way back in eighth grade and credits vibrant parishes and priests who were role models as some of his early influencers. After graduating from high school in 2000, he met the Jesuits at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he became active in campus ministry. During the summer between his junior and senior year, he worked at a Jesuit parish in Connecticut, another confirming step as he continued to discern his vocation. After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in political science, Fr. McLaughlin fulfilled his ROTC commitment and was commissioned in the U.S. Air Force before serving with a small intelligence unit in Southern England. The desire for a vocation was so strong that Fr. McLaughlin asked to be released from his commitment early, and when that was granted in 2006, he joined the Jesuits.

As a novice, Fr. McLaughlin worked as a chaplain at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C., and studied Spanish in Bolivia. Missioned next to Fordham University, he earned a master’s of philosophy in 2011 while working with the RCIA program at Fordham and at St. Barnabas Hospital. At Cheverus High School in Portland, Maine, he taught theology while assisting with the Model U.N. Club and the track and cross-country teams.

Missioned next to the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University in Berkeley, California, he earned a master’s of Divinity degree as well as a master’s of Theology while working as a deacon with the young adult group at St. Ignatius Parish in San Francisco. His first Masses as a priest were at the College of the Holy Cross and, a week later, at St. Joseph Church in Portland, Maine.

Father McLaughlin joined the parish staff in June 2017.



Rev. William J. Bergen, S.J. Rev. William J. Bergen, S.J., Senior Priest

Father William Bergen, S.J. was born and raised in Manhattan, attended Jesuit schools, and entered the Jesuit Novitiate in Poughkeepsie in 1955. He was ordained to the priesthood by Cardinal Francis Spellman in 1965 at Fordham University Church. Following advanced studies in theology at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D. C., he taught theology at St. Peter’s College in Jersey City. During these years he was also active in retreat work at Mount Manresa, the Jesuit retreat house on Staten Island. From 1983 to 1989, Father Bergen worked as a parish priest at St. Ignatius Church in Baltimore, Maryland, and as a retreat director at Bon Secours Spiritual Center in Marriottsville, Maryland.

Father Bergen has been a member of the parish staff since 1989.



Teresa Marie Cariño Teresa Marie Cariño, Pastoral Associate

Originally from the San Francisco Bay Area, Teresa Marie Cariño has deep roots in the Jesuit education tradition.

After graduating from St. Ignatius College Prep, she attended the University of San Francisco (USF), earning a bachelor’s degree in Theology and Religious Studies with minors in Catholic Studies & Social Thought and Philippine Studies. While at USF, Teresa worked in the University Ministry office and co-founded the student leadership group Ignatian Companions. She also studied abroad with the Casa Bayanihan program at the Ateneo de Manila University in the Philippines, working with marginalized communities.

Upon graduation, Teresa joined the Jesuit Volunteer Corps, spending a year of service working as a Tenant Organizer in New York City.

Teresa joined the parish staff in June 2015.



Carly-Anne Gannon Carly-Anne Gannon, Director of Religious Education/Pastoral Associate

A native of Ireland, Carly-Anne Gannon has a bachelor’s degree in religion and theology and a master’s degree in ecumenics, both from Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin.

Carly-Anne also earned a master’s of education from the University of Notre Dame. As part of the Alliance for Catholic Education program, she taught middle school religion and high school theology in Corpus Christi, Texas. Carly-Anne then transitioned to full-time pastoral ministry as a Catholic Campus minister at Stony Brook University.

Currently, she is a doctoral studies student of religious education at Fordham University. She is also an active member of the Catholic Young Adult community of New York City.

Carly-Anne joined the parish staff in August 2014.



K. Scott Warren K. Scott Warren, Director of Music

Organist, pianist, conductor, and composer K. Scott Warren joined the music staff in 2011 as Associate Director of Music. He was named Interim Director of Music in August 2011 and became the Director of Music in May 2012. Scott had previously served as Associate Musician (part-time) at The Church of St. Ignatius Loyola from 2001 to 2007. His experience as a liturgical musician includes serving as Music Director or Interim Director at several Manhattan churches, including Immanuel Lutheran Church, Park Avenue United Methodist Church, and Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church. In addition to his work at St. Ignatius, Scott currently serves as Organist/Choirmaster at Congregation Emanu-El of the City of New York, the largest Jewish house of worship in the world, where he plays the 4-manual, 135-rank Glück pipe organ and directs the 17-voice professional choir in over 120 choral liturgies annually.

Scott’s active career as a collaborative musician has led him to perform as organist and pianist with the New York Philharmonic, the American Symphony Orchestra, the New York Pops, the Orchestra of St. Lukes, the Dresden Philharmonic, and such notable choral ensembles as Musica Sacra, the Oratorio Society of New York, and Voices of Ascension. His work as an accompanist has been featured on local radio station WQXR, and nationally on NPR and PBS.

A long-time love of choral music led Scott to compose for the medium. Several of his pieces are published by Oxford University Press, and have been performed in New York City churches and in liturgies and concerts throughout North America, Europe, and Japan.

Scott’s musical interests are not limited to classical music. While growing up in Dallas, Texas, he played in a variety of local bands, including a five-year stint with the Al “TNT” Braggs Show Band, a popular Dallas-based rhythm and blues revue.

Scott is a graduate of the University of North Texas, where he studied organ with Jesse Eschbach and piano with Mary Nan Mailman.

Visit our Music section for additional Music Staff listings.



Fernando CastroFernando Castro, Treasurer

Fernando Castro joined The Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in March 2005. He is the Treasurer for St. Ignatius Loyola Church, Grammar School and Day Nursery, as well as the Jesuit Residence. His experience in the finance and non-profit sector spans more than 15 years. Prior to joining St. Ignatius, Mr. Castro was an Outsourcing Manager at Fiscal Management Associates (FMA), LLC, and was responsible for supervising their outsourced accounting engagements, software consulting projects, and fiscal services to start-up organizations.

Mr. Castro’s past positions also include working as a Field Agent with The Internal Revenue Service. In this role, he was responsible for conducting independent audits and related investigations of income tax returns, which covered a diversified spectrum of individual business taxpayers to include sole proprietorships, partnerships, C Corporations, and S Corporations. After leaving the IRS, Mr. Castro founded a tax and consulting firm focused on providing tax, payroll and bookkeeping services, including audits and other finance-related services. He later sold his practice to take a high level position with FMA.

Mr. Castro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting from New Jersey City University and became a Certified Public Accountant in 2000.

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Ignatian Tradition

Church History

We hope that your visit among us will be physically and spiritually refreshing.

Our church is administered by the Society of Jesus, a Roman Catholic religious order founded by St. Ignatius of Loyola in 1540.


The Founding of the Society of Jesus

St. Ignatius, born Iñigo López de Loyola in 1491, was a man whose life was marked by deep desires. While recuperating from a battle wound, the young courtier began to experience the fading of his romantic desires to perform chivalrous and gallant deeds just as his desire to follow Christ as his new lord began to grow strong. Full of zeal, Ignatius became a hermit, embarking upon a life of poverty and corporal and spiritual penance.

Transformed by an experience of spiritual consolation and the accompanying insight that God’s love is freely given, Ignatius cast aside the zealous penitential practices that were leading him to despair. It was during time that Ignatius began to learn the ways of “discerning spirits.” These experiences and insights became the foundation of his Spiritual Exercises – Ignatius’ singularly important contribution to the life of the Church from the Counter-Reformation onward. Ignatius was filled with a new desire to help people find God at work in their own lives.

Tempered by recognition of the need for advanced learning in Philosophy and Theology, Ignatius undertook studies at Barcelona, Alcala and Paris, all the while guiding people through the Spiritual Exercises. It was through this work that Ignatius drew to his side a band of companions who took vows of poverty and chastity. Soon after the completion of their studies, this band of men was hard at work in northern Italy preaching and tending the sick and the poor. Eventually, these companions, now numbering nine, made a communal discernment, based on their experience of joy and effectiveness together, that God was calling them to band together formally. In 1540, Paul III formally recognized these men as a new religious order – The Society of Jesus. 

Building on their experiences and desire to work for “the greater glory of God,” these first Jesuits, and all successive generations of companions following in their forebearers’ footsteps, dedicated themselves to teaching, preaching the Word of God, working with the poor and sick, and bringing the Good News preached by the Lord to those who knew not his name.


click to enlargeA Walking Tour
On December 11, 1898 the Roman Catholic Church of St. Ignatius Loyola was dedicated by the Most Reverend Michael Corrigan, third Archbishop of New York. The building stands on the site of the former St. Lawrence O’Toole Church, founded in 1851 and named for a twelfth-century bishop of Dublin by the parish’s first pastor, the Rev. Eugene O‘Reilly from Ireland. The parish was entrusted to the care of the Society of Jesus in 1866 and marked the Jesuits’ first major apostolate in the Yorkville area of New York. Replacing a modest brick building dating to 1853 which had replaced an even more modest wooden structure built in 1852, the present grand limestone edifice stands as testimony to both the growing affluence and confidence of the Catholic community on New York’s Upper East Side near the turn of the century as well as the ambitious determination of Fr. Neil McKinnon, S.J., pastor of the parish from 1893-1907.

St. Ignatius Church was designed by Schickel and Ditmars. Two unbroken vertical orders, a Palladian arched window, and a tri-part horizontal division suggesting the central nave and side aisles beyond, lend a Classical balance to the Park Avenue exterior. Yet St. Ignatius’ façade is not static; the central division raised in slight relief beyond the side divisions and the varying intervals between the symmetrically positioned pilasters (columns that are not free standing) create a subtly undulating dynamism that introduces a note of syncopated rhythm reminiscent of the exterior of Il Gesù , the Jesuits’ mother church in Rome. The original plans for the street front of St. Ignatius, presently 90 feet high and 87 feel wide, included a pair of towers designed to reach 210 feet above the ground, but this feature of the project was abandoned early, leaving only the two copper-capped tower bases on either side of the central pediment as hints of the grander scheme. Located directly beneath this pediment are the motto of the Society of Jesus, Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God) and the Great Seal of the Society, composed of a cross, three nails, and the letters I H S (the first three letters of Jesus’ name in Greek which later became a Latin acronym denoting Jesus the Savior of Humankind); together they proclaim to all who pass by that St. Ignatius is a Jesuit Parish.

St. Ignatius’ interior is distinguished by a magnification of the exterior’s subtle dynamism. Passing through the great bronze outer doors one enters the first interior space, the narthex (or foyer). Revetted (sheathed) in Bottincina-framed grey Cipollino marble and paved in pink Tennessee marble, the narthex is purposefully subdued, both in color and light, in order to heighten one’s experience of the visual drama waiting beyond the leather-clad inner doors.

click to enlargeCrossing the threshold into the church’s main interior is to enter into an unmistakable and unique sacred space. In true Baroque fashion, one is swept up in a fluid and vivid space awash in changing light, the play of bright and subdued colors, and a rich iconographic program. The basic design is that of a Roman basilica; a central longitudinal west/east nave, here supported by two side aisles and interrupted only by shallow vestigial north/south transepts, culminates in the curve-walled sanctuary apse that creates a 160 foot long space well suited to concentrating one’s attention on the drama of the liturgy. The visual drama continues in the vibrant interaction of the side aisles’ richly decorated and illuminated domes with the central nave’s 70-foot high gilt coffered barrel vault suffused with light from the multi-colored clerestory windows, a donation in memory of Elizabeth Hamilton Brady. Adding to this vitality is the magnification of visual space created by the lateral recession from free-standing polished pink granite columns, supporting the arches of the central nave, to the marble pilasters, supporting the arches of the side aisles, to the much smaller marble pilasters framing the Stations of the Cross. 

click to enlargeEnhancing the church’s interior dynamism are the rich and diverse colors and textures of the European and African marbles with which the walls are revetted. The wainscoting and pilasters throughout the church are covered in red-veined Numidian marble.  The majority of the wall panels are Yellow Sienna, though some panels are the black-flecked Sienna brecciata. The door frames and frames for the Stations of the Cross are done in light grey Convent Sienna marble. Throughout the church, but especially notable in the sanctuary, these marbles are outlined and separated from one another by inserts of varying shades of red Jasper. Most of the marble work in the church was done by Betterson and Eisele of New York. 

Two iconographic programs comprise the pictorial decoration of the church; the first celebrates the salvific truths of Christianity while the second commemorates moments in the life of the patronal saint, Ignatius Loyola, and the Jesuit order he founded.

Most likely the first image one encounters upon entering the church is that of the crucified Christ in the sanctuary apse’s semi-dome located directly above the Pavonazzo marble and gilt-bronze main alter. The painting’s tessellated appearance is meant to simulate the look of mosaic, the medium in which almost all other images in the church are rendered.  Sprouting from the foot of the cross is the expansive scroll of a colorful flowering vine painted against a gold leaf background – a vivid and beautiful image reminding the faithful that they are the branches whose life flows from the vinestock who is Christ the Savior. This foliate image is also found in the semi-domes above the Sacred Heart and Blessed Mother altars, similarly done in Pavonazzo marble, and serves in the unification of the entire chancel area that stretches from the seventy-eight foot width of the church. This visual unification of complimented by a theological one: the Sacred Heart, surrounded by the visionary St. Mary Margaret Alacoque and her Jesuit spiritual director, Saint Claude de la Colombiere, as well as the Blessed Mother, surrounded by the Archangel Gabriel of the Annunciation and the Prophet Isaiah, who foretold the virgin birth, bespeak God’s salvfic love which found its supreme expression in Christ’s self-sacrifice upon the cross.The Blessed Mother Altar 

Rising directly above the central semi-dome is the great sanctuary arch where one finds, located in an aureole, the glorified Christ seated in judgment surrounded by the Blessed Mother, here crowned Queen of Heaven, and St. Michael the Archangel who, as the defender against all powers of darkness, is pictured wielding a fiery sword. On either side of this central group are located Sts. Peter and Paul, and Moses and Elias; these figures represent the New Law and the Old Law which were conjoined in the person of Christ. Though some may find this pictorial program severe, it should bring to life the words of Psalm 63 and inspire the faithful who gaze upon it:

Longing, I come before thee in the sanctuary
To look upon thy power, and thy glory.
Thy true love is better than life;
Therefore I will sing thy praises.
And so I bless thee all my life
And in thy name lift my hands in prayer.

click to enlarge
Reflecting the shape of the sanctuary apse on a smaller scale at the opposite end of the church, the baptistry is also composed of half-drum surmounted by a semi-dome.  An anonymous benefaction, the baptistery was the first part of the church’s interior to be decorated and clearly no expense was spared in the creation of what is undoubtedly the most precious unit in the church. First to be noticed are the gilt flaming swords emblazoned on the semi-circular iron screen designed by the architect, William Schickel, and wrought by the hands of Mr. John Williams. Just as the fearless St. Michael and his fiery sword protect the precincts of heaven, these swords designate the precincts of the baptistery to be a special place in the church’s sacred space, and serve to remind the faithful that at baptism each person becomes “a child of the light” emboldened to stand against the powers of darkness.

Mosaic pavement with font - click to enlarge
The marble mosaic pavement of the baptistry depicts four rivers flowing from the foot of the Carrarra marble font – a design suggesting Eden’s river, the fountainhead for the four rivers of the world mentioned in Genesis 2. These rushing waters gather into a pool where lilies grow and fish frolic. Among the smaller fish is a large fish resting on an anchor, a second-century Christian symbol for Christ (the five letters spelling “fish” in Greek, i ch th y s, comprise an acronym for “Jesus, the Christ, of God, Son, and Savior”). Drawing on this ancient symbolism, the motto at the edge of the pavement, taken from Tertullian, states, “We little fishes are born again in the water of our fish Jesus Christ” and reminds the faithful of the utterly transforming power of the sacrament of baptism. This pavement was designed by Heaton, Butler & Bayne of London, with slight modifications made by Mr. John Buck of the Ecclesiastical Department of the Gorham Company of New York; the Gorham Company was also responsible for cutting and installing the mosaic’s tesserae (the pieces comprising the mosaic). 

Because the baptistry is also the Chapel of John the Baptist, its ornamentation illustrates the saint’s ministry, his prophecies about Jesus, and Jesus’ pronouncements about John. For example, the three mosaics decorating the walls depict important moments in the Baptist’s earthly life: his sanctification at the time of the Visitation; the culmination of his ministry in baptizing Jesus in the River Jordan; and his martyrdom. These murals were also designed by Heaton, Butler and Bayne. The Venetian glass tesserae were cut and laid out by Salviati & Company of Venise. The expertise of the Gorham Company was called upon again to install this new mosaic program; the company also designed and executed the lectern with its inlaid brass images of the Lion of Juda and the Sacrificial Lamb.

Central mosaic panel: Cousins Christ and John as children - click to enlargeThe baptistry’s altar, like the curved walls surrounding it, is of Pavonazzo marble and is inlaid with mosaics; it was designed and executed under the direction of Mr. Caryl Coleman of the Ecclesiastical Department of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company. These mosaics, composed of that company’s justly famous opalescent Favrile glass, are as delicate as the Venetian glass mosaics above are bold.  The tabernacle door is decorated with a mosaic of the Lamb of God whom John attested Jesus to be (John 1:29). The panels that front the base of the altar have an art-historical as well as scriptural and theological significance. The two side panels are mosaic renditions of the Archangels Gabriel and Michael after the Florentine Renaissance master, Sandro Botticelli.  The central panel, after the Umbrian Renaissance master, Pinturicchio, depicts the cousins Christ and John as children engaged in the everyday task of collecting water in a ewer at a country stream – a foreshadowing of the sacred drama played out on the banks of the Jordan long years after. The inscription above this panel, “Behold, I send my Angel” (Ecce mitto Angelum Meum), refers to Jesus’ prophet-based acknowledgement of John as his forerunner (Mt. 11:10). Completing this mosaic program and located on the columns supporting the mensa (horizontal surface) of the altar are the frail reeds swept by the wind which, Jesus says, John, the Angelum, surely is not (Mt. 11:8).

Baptistry gate with Tiffany semidome - click to enlargeTiffany Glass and Decorating Company was also responsible for the creation of the baptistry’s semi-dome. Composed of irregularly faceted glass slags referred to as “jewel” glass in the Tiffany lexicon, the dome suffuses this special precinct of the church with brilliant and sparkling light. At the apex of the design is a dove representing the Holy Spirit; rising from the waters of the font under this image symbolizes God’s claiming the newly baptized as his beloved child in the same way that Jesus was publicly claimed by God as His beloved Son on whom His favor rests (Mt. 3:17).

The marble mosaic Stations of the Cross form the panels which comprise the majority of the wall space in the church. These murals, designed by Professor Paoletti for Salviati & Company of Venice, are subdued both in color and design befitting the gravity of the story they tell. Especially worthy to note in these panels is the cast of the sky mirroring the drama of the Lord’s Passion:  the progressive subtle darkening of the sky culminates in the crepuscular atmosphere of the Twelfth Station – The Crucifixion. So pleased was the company with the quality of its work that some of the panels were publicly exhibited in Turin before making their way to St. Ignatius Church. The manufacture and installation of the Stations was made possible through a combination of memorial and anonymous gifts.

Bronze Door [detail] - click to enlarge
Bronze doors- click to enlarge
The great twelve-panel bronze doors located at the sanctuary end of the side aisles were gifts of the Simpson Family in 1929 and mark the close of a generation of very generous pre-Depression benefactions. The doors were designed by the Rev. Patrick O’Gorman, S.J., pastor from 1924 to 1929; the north-side doors depict the saints who personify one of each of the eight Beatitudes while the south-side doors depict the saints who personify one of each of the seven Gifts of the Holy Spirit. Crafted by the Long Island Bronze Company, these one-of-a-kind portals are beautiful compliments to the fenestrated bronze sanctuary doors on either side of the main altar, given in 1928 by Mrs. William Simpson, the bronze high pulpit, given in 1929 as an anonymous gift, the hanging bronze sanctuary lamp, gift of Mr. And Mrs. John Agar in 1914, and the bronze choir screen, given in 1907 by Mrs. Nicholas Brady in memory of her father, Patrick Garvan.

St. Ignatius 1540 - click to enlargeThe second icongraphic program in the church commemorates moments in the life of St. Ignatius (1491-1556) and the religious order he founded. Most prominent amount these decorations are the three murals, double framed in pink Algerian marble and bronze bands, adorning the walls of the sanctuary’s apse.  These mosaics were also manufactured by Salviati & Company after designs by Professor Paoletti suggested by the Rev. David Hearn, S.J., pastor from 1909 to 1915.  Owing to the rich hues of their Venetian glass, these panels display a colorful exuberance well suited to the life of the saint they celebrate.  The mural on the left depicts the wounding of Inigo (later Ignatius) de Loyola in the battle of Pamplona – the “happy fault” of the saint’s youth that was the occasion for his convalescence and conversion to serve Christ as his new master.  The mural on the right portrays a scene set in 1540; St. Ignatius and three of his companions kneel before Pope Paul III begging approbation of the rule for the religious order they wish to found, namely the Society of Jesus. The central mosaic depicts the Apotheosis of St. Ignatius – the glorification of Ignatius at the time of his canonization.

The church’s shallow transepts are each composed of two arches. On the south side, in the arch nearest the Sacred Heart altar, is a stained glass window depicting the appearance of the Sacred Heart of Jesus to St. Margaret Mary in the chapel of her monastery at Paray-le-Monial; in the second arch is an altar and stained glass window dedicated to St. Joseph as the Patron of the Universal Church.  Counterbalancing these elements, the north transept features two memorials that continue the story of Ignatius and his companions. In the arch nearest the Blessed Mother altar is a stained glass window picturing Ignatius in the cave at Manresa, below which is placed a replica of The Black Madonna – the famous Romanesque wooden sculpture in the Benedictine Abbey of Montserrat located near Barcelona.  Together the sculpture and window recount an important period in the saint’s life. After returning to health following his convalescence and conversion at home in Loyola, the young man traveled to Montserrat where, in front of The Black Madonna, he formally renounced his previous life as a courtier and all associated vanities, put down his sword, dedicated himself to the service of Christ, and embraced a regime of poverty and corporal and spiritual penance.  Having moved into a cave at nearby Manresa on the banks of the Cardoner River to live out his new life as a hermit, Ignatius found himself driven to the edge of guilt-laden despair. It was while sitting in prayer on the banks of the river that Ignatius came to experience the consolation and the accompanying insight that God’s love is freely and wholly given; this experience and insight form the very foundation of his Spiritual Exercises – a seminal document of Christian spirituality that has aided people of all generations in discerning God’s will in their lives.  The window pictures Ignatius, having now cast away the three instruments of his distracting bodily penance much as he had put aside his sword and the unfulfilling life associated with it, kneeling before a crucifix and looking up at the Blessed Mother who inspires his writing the Spiritual Exercises.  Armed with his transforming experience and insight, Ignatius left Manresa and engaged the world. 

Since their composition, the Spiritual Exercises have helped bring to Ignatius’ side many loyal companions desiring to serve Christ and work for “The Greater Glory of God” by following the saint’s rule for religious life.  Fittingly, the altar “Consecrated to All the Canonized Sons of St. Ignatius” is located next to the Manresa window and The Black Madonna in the transept’s adjoining arch. Above the altar is a stained glass window which pictures, in its upper Order, Ignatius and his brother Jesuit saints gathered around their Lord whose name they bear, and, in its lower Order, all of the Society’s Blessed and Martyrs, bearing palm branches denoting their sufferings and victories.

Notable amount the saints of the Society are St. Francis Xavier, the great “Apostle to the Indies,” and St. John Francis Regis, the great evangelist of the Alps for whom the adjoining scholarship high school is named.  Befitting their heroic apostolic works, heroic-sized Carrarra marble statues of these two saints, carved by the Joseph Sibbel Studio of New York, are located in the sanctuary on the south and north sides, respectively, of the main altar.

Boy Saints Statue - click to enlarge
The equally worthy of note, and held in great affection because of their youthful zeal, are the “Boy Saints” of the Society – John Berchmans, Aloysius Gonzaga, and Stanislaus Kostka.  The altar dedicated to them as “Patrons of Youth” bears their statues, rendered in Carrarra marble, set within a rich frame of Pavonazzo and Convent Siena marbles profusely dressed with gilt bronze decorations. This altar, located directly across the choir end of the nave from the equally splendid but differently designed baptistry, furnishes yet another note in the dynamic decorative rhythm enlivening the church interior.

Mander Organ - click to enlarge
The rhythmic notes of a different sort must also be acknowledged.  St. Ignatius’ unique sacred space is filled with sacred music that both compliments the visual dynamism of the building and deepens devotion at the liturgy and other rituals that occur within its walls.  Much of this music comes from the church’s magnificent new organ. Built by N.P. Mander of London, this instrument is New York City’s largest mechanical action (tracker) pipe organ, and the largest mechanical action pipe organ ever to have been built in the British Isles. The exterior case, rising 45 feet from the floor of the choir loft to within inches of the top of the barrel vault, is fashioned from French oak harvested from huge trees planted in the 18th century.  The organ contains over 5,000 pipes and weighs approximately 30 tons.  Dedicated in 1993, this instrument has come to the church through two extremely generous donations, one anonymous and the other made in honor of Sandra G. Montrone by her family.

It is in the lofty heights of the barrel vault that the last motifs to be looked at are found.  Located in the seven spandrels (triangular architectural features) at the base of each side of the vault are octagonal gold medallions intended to be filled with portraits of the Prophets, on the north side, and the Doctors of the Church, on the south side. Only one portrait on each side has ever been completed – the prophet Isaiah and St. Augustine.  Along the median line of the vault, alternating with the four great bronze star-burst light clusters, are four ecclesiastical heraldic devices.  From the sanctuary end they are: the coat of arms of Leo XIII, Pope at the time of the dedication of the church; the coat of arms of the Archdiocese of New York; the seal of the Society of Jesus; and the Seal representing the consecration of the United States to Mary Immaculate. These various devices illustrate the levels of the Church which this church building embodies.

It is our hope that a visit to St. Ignatius, whether for a liturgy, quiet prayer, a concert, or a simple tour, will engage your heart and senses, and dispose you to experience more deeply the reality of God’s unfailing salvific love, the story of which unfolds within these walls, within the Church, and throughout the world in which we love and work.


(Text derived from The Church of St. Ignatius Loyola: A Walking Tour, 2016; Photos by Laurie Lambrecht)

For their generous services in creating the Walking Tour (available for sale at the Parish House), the Parish wishes to extend a sincere note of thanks to its author, Paul Tabor, to Laurie Lambrecht for her wonderful photography, and to designer, Elizabeth O’Sullivan.

Mission

We are called and outfitted by God’s grace to be a community of true disciples, gathered in prayer and worship, sharing the Universal Church’s mission of evangelization and service. 

Our Jesuit heritage commits us to:

  • deep personal love for Jesus Christ
  • prayerful discernment of God’s Will in everyday life
  • solidarity with those most in need
  • partnership in ministry
  • availability of new missions
  • work for justice and reconciliation
  • ecumenical and interreligious dialogue
  • outreach to alienated Christians and non-believers
  • faith formation of individuals and families, inspired by the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius

Emmaus Bereavement Ministry

In their loss, Christ walked with them.

Maesta: Christ Appearing on the Road to Emmaus, 1308-11, Ducci di Buoninsegna

The Emmaus Group of St. Ignatius Loyola offers a safe environment, enriched by our faith, where we meet to share our sorrow, our stories, and our victories over sadness. As a community of faith, we find comfort in the promise of Jesus to be with us always.

Emmaus Bereavement Support Group
A six-session education and support group for those who are grieving the death of a loved one at least three months prior to the start of the program. The group is facilitated by two bereavement professionals. The sessions are held over a period of nine weeks in order to give the participants time to absorb the material. 

Resources
Please click here for a list of suggested readings dealing with the subject of bereavement.

Come and let us walk together—
as a community of faith—
on the journey to healing.

Space Rentals

The Church of St. Ignatius Loyola has several spaces available for rent. From receptions to lectures, one of our spaces is sure to fit your event needs.

To book one of our spaces, click here to complete our reservation form.

For additional questions, contact our Events Coordinator, Caroline Fernandes, at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or by telephone at (212) 288-3588.

Click on a name below for more information on each space:

Wallace Hall

8000 square feet
Maximum capacity: 250 (seated) / 900 (standing)

At the Parish House

The Parish Lounge
550 square feet
Maximum capacity: 45

Meeting Room
420 square feet
Maximum capacity: 45

Stewardship and Giving

Regular Offertory Giving, One Time Donations, and Specific Month Donations

Please click on this link to learn more about online giving. Thank you for your generosity!


“Ignatian missionary spirit tends to make of a Jesuit parish a ‘base of operations.’ It is difficult to imagine a Jesuit parish reduced to a well-built compound waiting for people to come! This spirit of openness and outreach calls for an atmosphere of welcome, encouragement, guidance and support.”

- Fr. Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, SJ
Superior General of the Society of Jesus
On Parish Ministry, 2005

Bequests

A donation to the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in your will is fully tax deductible and will help us sustain our work, our mission, and our ministries for future generations.

Making a charitable bequest is easy. If you want to leave a donation to the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, you must specifically do so in a will or trust. Your will or personal trusts are legal records of your wishes regarding how your assets should be handled at your death. Instructions regarding the disposition of your assets are called bequests.

Charitable bequests are not subject to estate or inheritance taxes, so the tax burden on your estate will be reduced. Your estate will be entitled to a charitable deduction for the full, fair market value of your gift. Of course, you can always change your will to reflect changing circumstances.

If you choose to include us in your will, won’t you let us know? You can contact Fernando Castro, Treasurer, with information and/or questions at 212-288-6200, or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). He can also assist you and your attorney with the standard language necessary to establish your charitable bequest. Any information you provide will be held in strict confidence.

We thank you for ensuring the legacy of your memory through a bequest to the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola.

Day Nursery

The Saint Ignatius Loyola Day Nursery, located at 240 East 84th Street, has its own website.

You may visit the Day Nursery website by clicking on the following link: http://www.ignatiusdn.org/

 

Driving Directions


From Long Island

You have several choices:

1)  Long Island Expressway (I-495) to exit 30W, towards Midtown Tunnel

Take Grand Central Parkway (Exit 22A) towards 108th St. Keep right at the fork in the ramp

Grand Central Parkway goes into Triborough Bridge. Keep to the right, take the exit for Manhattan. Keep to the center through the tolls, follow signs for FDR Drive South

Exit at 96 Street (Exit 14)

Either go right onto 96th Street, drive across town to Park Avenue and turn left OR

Go straight onto York Avenue, turn right at 85th Street, turn left at Park Avenue

2) Take Southern State Parkway to Meadowbrook Parkway (Exit 22N)

Take Meadowbrook Parkway to Northern State Parkway

Stay on Northern State Parkway—it becomes Grand Central Parkway

Grand Central Parkway goes into the Triborough Bridge. Keep to the right, take the exit for Manhattan

Keep to the center through the tolls, follow signs for FDR Drive South

Exit at 96th Street (Exit 14)

Either go right onto 96th Street, drive across town to Park Avenue and turn left OR

Go straight onto York Avenue, turn right at 85th Street, turn left at Park Avenue


From Westchester

New York State Thruway (I-87) South

Exit 3, towards East 138 Street

Stay straight to go onto Exterior Street. Turn right onto Madison Avenue Bridge

Madison Avenue Bridge becomes Madison Avenue. Turn left onto 135th Street. Turn right onto Park Avenue

Turn left onto East 132nd Street, take the FDR Drive South to 96th Street (Exit 14)

Either go right onto 96th Street, drive across town to Park Avenue and turn left OR

Go straight onto York Avenue, turn right at 85th Street, turn left at Park Avenue


From the Queens Midtown Tunnel

On exiting the tunnel, take the 35th Street exit on the left towards 34 Street/Downtown

Make a slight left onto Tunnel Exit Street, which becomes Tunnel Exit Street/Queens Midtown Tunnel Exit

Turn left onto East 34th Street - stay straight to go onto East 34th Street Exit

Turn left onto FDR Drive Service Road East. Take FDR Drive North

Exit at 96 Street (Exit 14)

Turn left onto East 96th Street. Turn left onto Park Avenue

The church is at Park Avenue and 84 Street


From the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel

On exiting the tunnel, take South Street. South Street becomes FDR Drive North

Exit at 96th Street (Exit 14)

Turn left onto 96 Street. Turn left onto Park Avenue

The church is at Park Avenue and 84 Street



From the Lincoln Tunnel

On exiting the tunnel, exit on the left towards 40th Street 7 North/West Side Hwy

Take West Side Highway to 79th Street

Turn left onto Broadway

Take Broadway to 86th Street, turn right onto 86th Street

Take 86th Street through Central Park. You will exit the park on 84th Street

The church is on the corner of 84 Street and Park Avenue



From Rockland County

Palisades Parkway South. Exit right for George Washington Bridge

Stay in the second lane from the right, go under the apartment houses and exit to the right onto Harlem River Drive/Amsterdam Avenue. At the fork, stay to the left (Harlem River Drive)

Stay straight to go onto the FDR Drive South

Exit at 96th Street (Exit 14)

Either go right onto 96th Street, drive across town to Park Avenue and turn left OR

Go straight onto York Avenue, turn right at 85th Street, turn left at Park Avenue


PARKING
There are numerous parking garages in the neighborhood. The closest is Belmont, located at 113 East 84th Street (between Park and Lexington), 212-288-9170

Additional parking garages include:

Albert Parking LLC
30 East 85th Street
(between 5th and Madison)
212-249-5290

Central Parking Systems
185 East 85th Street
(entrance at 85th and Third)
800-836-6666

Imperial Parking Systems
400 East 85th Street
(85th and First Avenue)
212-650-1683

Ignatian Social Justice

Ignatian Social Justice (ISJ) is a ministry of the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola made up of parishioners committed to:

(1)  raising awareness of current Catholic social teaching; and

(2)  advocating for social justice on timely and underappreciated issues.

The volunteer group embraces the responsibility to inform, engage, and mobilize parishioners to promote social justice in our local community. The ministry divides its time between advocacy and promoting awareness through a dialog with local leaders on social justice issues. The ministry is especially committed to pursuing issues and perspectives that would not otherwise be apparent to St. Ignatius parishioners.

Recent Events:
In April,ISJ conducted a advocacy campaign for the “Bread For The World 2018 Offering of Letters.” The parish community signed over 300 letters to our regional legislators urging them to make public investments that will provide needed resources in our community, and move us toward the end of hunger worldwide. The campaign was concluded with visits to our elected officials in May, along with other faith communities, to personally seek their commitment. Our efforts were well received.

In May, ISJ hosted author Joseph Califano to discuss his recent book Our Damaged Democracy: We The People Must Act. Califano shared his unique insights with over 100 attending parishioners, concerning the changes—political, cultural, constitutional, technological, institutional—that damage our government and the urgent need to fix our democracy. The lecture included anecdotes and examples featuring every modern president and actions of both parties. Copies of the book were available and signed by the author. The evening concluded with a reception, offering parishioners an opportunity to continue the discussion and share their thoughts.

Liturgies & Sacraments

In Christian tradition, liturgy is understood as the participation of the People of God in “the work of God.”  Through the liturgy, Christ continues the work of our redemption in, with, and through his Church.

At its best, liturgy engages the faithful in the life of the community and involves the “conscious, active, and fruitful participation” of everyone.

At Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, we are committed to creating an environment in which liturgy draws together a diverse community of the faithful.  Nourished by Word and Sacrament, we are empowered to live the Eucharist in the world through our interactions with others and through our work for justice.

To serve the needs of our parishioners, the parish offers a full array of opportunities for preparation and reception of the church’s sacraments.

OVERVIEW OF THE SEVEN SACRAMENTS
Most people know that much of Roman Catholic teaching and practice is based on sacraments. The Catholic Church, they say, is a Sacramental Church.

The word “sacrament” means sign. We believe, first of all, that the Church itself is a sign of Christ’s continuing presence among us. So in this most general sense the Church itself is a sacrament because the Church as the People of God signifies Christ as risen Lord present in our world today.

But the Church is a special kind of sign, not some lifeless symbol. The Church very actively lives out its role as a sign of Christ’s presence by helping us encounter Christ. One specific way – among others – that the Church acts out its sign function is through seven rituals or ceremonies. Through these seven actions we worship God as Father, Son and Holy Spirit and through them we encounter Christ. Thus these seven actions hold a very privileged place in the life of Catholic Christians. They are called the seven sacraments. Each of these sacraments in its own way signifies Christ reaching out to encounter his people.

Think of the seven sacraments, therefore, as privileged actions of our sacramental church. The traditional definition of sacraments - “outward signs instituted by Christ to give grace” - expresses the essence of the mystery but not the dynamism. Sacraments are celebrated at particular times in our lives to communicate grace, which is God sharing his life with us. Sacramental grace supports us in responding to Christ’s invitation to follow him as disciples.

The seven sacraments can be grouped together under various headings to show the connections between them.

The sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, and Eucharist are called Sacraments of Initiation. We say that receiving these sacraments “initiates” one into the life of the Church.

About Us

The Parish of St. Ignatius Loyola is a vibrant faith community administered by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). Located on New York City’s Upper East Side, the Parish offers a wide range of ministries and welcomes new parishioners and visitors.

This site will provide you with a glimpse into our Parish life, which includes daily and weekly masses, celebration of the sacraments, education opportunities and, our service and music programs. All of these elements work together to nourish the spiritual development of our parishioners and to reach out to the larger community within the city.

Operating within the framework of Ignatian spirituality and the Jesuit tradition, we seek to answer the Lord’s call in our shared ministry as a true community of disciples, gathered in prayer and worship, sharing the Universal Church’s mission of evangelization and service.

Baptism

Font from Above [in Baptistry] - click to enlargeThrough the Sacrament of Baptism, we are freed from sin and reborn as children of God. We become members of Christ, are incorporated into the Church, and made sharers in the Church’s mission. Through the waters of Baptism, sin is forgiven and the new Christian, having died with Christ, rises to new and everlasting life.

Baptismal Font - click to enlarge

Baptism of Adults
Since the beginning of the Church, adults have been welcomed into the church through baptism after a period of instruction, prayer, and reflection.

For more information about the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults, click here.

 

Infant Baptism
Infant Baptism is a beautiful, life-changing Sacrament where children are freed from sin, reborn in the Holy Spirit, and welcomed into our community of faith, the family of God.

The Sacrament of Baptism for infants is celebrated in a communal ceremony on selected Sundays throughout the year. Each ceremony begins at 1:00 PM in the main church. Parents are asked to check in 15 minutes prior to the start. Space is limited. Parents are encouraged to register as soon as possible.

For more information, contact Maureen Haley at 212-288-3588 x636 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Baptism Preparation Class
The Baptism preparation class is designed for parents to prayerfully prepare for their child’s Baptism by understanding the spiritual significance of this event. Parents are asked to reflect on their own Baptism and its effect and meaning in their lives as they come together as a family to the waters of Baptism.

New parents are required to take the course prior to their child’s Baptism. Though the class is designed for parents, godparents are welcome, but not required, to attend.

If you are having your child or godchild baptized in another church, you are welcome to attend the class. A certificate will be provided at the end of the session.

For more information, contact Maureen Haley at 212-288-3588 x636 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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ARCHIVED BULLETINS 2017-18
June 17, 2018Father’s Day Reflections

June 10, 2018Welcome, Fr. Konzman!
June 3, 2018Feast of Corpus Christi
May 27, 2018Creating a Space for Men
May 20, 2018A Bold Church or a Museum of Memories
May 13, 2018Remaining in the Vine
May 6, 2018A Fortunate Absence
April 29, 2018Notes From Our New Catholics
April 22, 2018Hearing the Cry of the Earth
April 15, 2018Your Parish, Your Home: Campaign for the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola
April 8, 2018Courage to Go Out
April 1, 2018Our Savior Lives, Alleluia, Alleluia
March 25, 2018A Lowly King Who Regathers the People
March 18, 2018Visions of Eternity
March 11, 2018The Urgency of Discernment
March 4, 2018To Love More
February 25, 2018Questions and Answers
February 18, 2018Peace I Leave You, My Peace I Give You
February 11, 2018Ashes and the Holy
February 4, 2018“Reality Has Never Betrayed Me”
January 28, 2018Catholic Schools Week
January 21, 2018Week of Prayer For Christian Unity: Your Right Hand, O Lord, Glorious in Power
January 14, 2018A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
January 7, 2018Journey of the Magi
December 31, 2017The Holy Family – A Work in Progress
December 24, 2017Back to Basics, A Christmas Story
December 17, 2017The Model for Advent Spirituality: John the Baptist
December 10, 2017If I Had Only Known
December 3, 2017A Doctrine of Mercy for All and For One
November 26, 2017When, in Our Music, God Is Glorified: Choosing Music for Our Liturgies
November 19, 2017Intimations of Immortality
November 12, 2017The Fervor in Action
November 5, 2017Counting Our Blessings
October 29, 2017Rooted and Grounded in Love: Reform, Reconciliation, Renewal
October 22, 2017The N.P. Mander Organ at 25
October 15, 2017Dirty Shoes
October 8, 2017Sharing Experience, Strength, and Hope: Recovery Sunday 2017
October 1, 2017The Dynamic Movement for Human Life
September 24, 2017The Jesuits and…
September 17, 2017The Risk of Religious Education
September 10, 2017Only When It Is Dark Enough Can You See the Stars


ARCHIVED BULLETINS 2016-17
September 3, 2017Summer 2017
August 27, 2017Summer 2017
August 20, 2017Summer 2017
August 13, 2017Summer 2017
August 6, 2017Summer 2017
July 30, 2017Summer 2017
July 23, 2017Summer 2017
July 16, 2017Summer 2017
July 9, 2017Summer 2017
July 2, 2017Summer 2017
June 25, 2017Summer 2017
June 18, 2017Welcome, Fr. McLaughlin!
June 11, 2017A Letter From the Pastor
June 4, 2017Ah! Bright Wings
May 28, 2017Notes from Our New Catholics
May 21, 2017Haydn’s The Creation
May 14, 2017Inspiration for Motherhood from the Communion of Saints
May 7, 2017What Does It Mean to Pray for Vocations?
April 30, 2017What Happens After Confirmation?
April 23, 2017Divine Mercy Sunday | The Jesuit Ministry of Reconciliation
April 16, 2017Easter Sunday 2017
April 9, 2017The Holiest of Weeks
April 2, 2017The Barque of Peter — Navigating in Hope
March 26, 2017Perhaps Today More Than Ever
March 19, 2017Back to the Future
March 12, 2017Heralds of Hope
March 5, 2017Planning for Your Spiritual Retirement
February 26, 2017Called by Name: A Personal and Communal Journey
February 19, 2017Upon this Handful of Earth
February 12, 2017“You Have A Duty To Create A Beautiful Life”
February 5, 2017Ruined For Life
January 29, 2017Catholic Schools Week
January 22, 2017Prayer Should Be Like Breathing
January 15, 2017Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, S.J. (1928–2016)
January 8, 2017Live in the Light
January 1, 2017Mother of God
December 25, 2016A Christmas Letter
December 18, 2016“A Family of Families”
December 11, 2016WWW.FORMED.ORG
December 4, 2016The Glimmer of an Undeniable Beauty
November 27, 2016We Wait
November 20, 2016Mercy Changes the World
November 13, 2016Daniel Boone in the Lady Chapel
November 6, 2016Jubilee for the Homeless
October 30, 2016Jesuits at St. Ignatius Loyola Parish—Celebrating 150 Years!
October 23, 2016Jesuits in the Americas: Zipoli and His World
October 16, 2016With Mary Visiting and Welcoming Guests
October 9, 2016Recovery
October 2, 2016Faith and Darkness
September 25, 2016The Ever-Youthful Face of Mercy: Pilgrims Reflect on World Youth Day 2016
September 18, 2016Our Parish, Our Home
September 11, 2016Lay Ministers’ Enrichment: Entering Absence



ARCHIVED BULLETINS 2015-16
September 4, 2016Summer 2016
August 28, 2016Summer 2016
August 21, 2016Summer 2016
August 14, 2016Summer 2016
August 7, 2016Summer 2016
July 31, 2016Summer 2016
July 24, 2016Summer 2016
July 17, 2016Summer 2016
July 10, 2016Summer 2016
July 3, 2016Summer 2016
June 26, 2016Summer 2016
June 19, 2016Anger and Forgiveness
June 12, 2016Mercy is Love: A Letter to the World Youth Day Pilgrims
June 5, 2016The Spirit of Change and the Spirit of Wisdom
May 29, 2016Come, Have Breakfast
May 22, 2016Ordinary Questions, Extraordinary Answers
May 15, 2016Pentecost and Social Justice
May 8, 2016Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs
May 1, 2016Working with Joseph
April 24, 2016The Holy Spirit is Alive and Well Here: More Notes from Our New Catholics
April 17, 2016Word Clouds
April 10, 2016The Joy of Ministry As Your Pastor
April 3, 2016Divine Mercy Sunday
March 27, 2016Alleluia
March 20, 2016Watch and Pray
March 13, 2016Stabat Mater
March 6, 2016Lent and Forgiveness
February 28, 2016Through the Looking Glass
February 21, 2016Ignite: A Community Within a Community
February 14, 2016Spiritual Quest: Seeking Love in Christ
February 7, 2016Mercy | Passion | Joy
January 31, 2016A Community of Faith, Knowledge & Service
January 24, 2016Full of Grace: Sacred Arthouse
January 17, 2016Solidarity, Suffering & Grace
January 10, 2016My Friend Mary
January 3, 2016Janua, Janus, Januarius
December 20, 2015Nostalgia and Hope
December 13, 2015Mercy Me!
December 6, 2015God Was Just Waiting for Me to Be Ready
November 29, 2015The Measure of Our Days
November 22, 2015A Late Harvest
November 15, 2015For Dappled Things
November 8, 2015Faces Without Names
November 1, 2015Hearing God’s Call
October 25, 2015Peace Without. Peace Within.
October 18, 2015The Society of St. Vincent de Paul: Who Are We and What Do We Do?
October 11, 2015Welcome, Fr. Yesalonia!
October 4, 2015The Mystery of Mercy
September 27, 2015Singing the Body Electric
September 20, 2015Pope Francis & the World Meeting of Families
September 13, 2015A Concert of Charisms



ARCHIVED BULLETINS 2014-15
September 6, 2015Summer 2015
August 30, 2015Summer 2015
August 23, 2015Summer 2015
August 16, 2015Summer 2015
August 9, 2015Summer 2015
August 2, 2015Summer 2015
July 26, 2015Summer 2015
July 19, 2015Summer 2015
July 12, 2015Summer 2015
July 5, 2015Summer 2015
June 28, 2015Summer 2015
June 21, 2015When Was The Moment?
June 14, 2015Blessings Bestowed. Graces Received.
June 7, 2015An Examen of a Grateful Heart
May 31, 2015The Trinity: Eternal Exchange of Love
May 24, 2015The Birth of the Church
May 17, 2015God’s Loving Embrace: Notes From Our New Catholics
May 10, 2015Litany of the Motherhood of Mary
May 3, 2015Bach’s Mass in B minor
April 26, 2015Hearing the Shepherd’s Voice Today
April 19, 2015Mercy and Justice
April 12, 2015A Heart for Those in Need
April 5, 2015Christ is Risen!
March 29, 2015Palm Sunday: The Narthex of Holy Week
March 22, 2015Into your hands I commit my spirit
March 15, 2015Saint Patrick and the Immigration Debate
March 8, 2015Transfiguration
March 1, 2015My Visit With Pope Francis
February 22, 2015Lent and RCIA: A Healing Time
February 15, 2015Listening for the Still, Small Voice of God
February 8, 2015“The Pope’s Prayer Group”: The Apostleship of Prayer
February 1, 2015Meeting Christ in Prayer: A Lantern of Light
January 25, 2015My Trip to Vietnam: Walking with Christ Half a World Away
January 18, 2015Week of Prayer for Christian Unity
January 11, 2015At the Crossroads, Wisdom Speaks
January 4, 2015A Church Without Frontiers, Mother to All
December 28, 2014Pope Francis on the Holy Family
December 21, 2014The Divine Omnipotence of Love
December 14, 2014Gaudete! The Fragility of Life
December 7, 2014Wide Open Doors
November 30, 2014From Contemplation to Exaltation
November 23, 2014Consumerism and Human Trafficking
November 16, 2014The Hard Work of Forgiveness
November 9, 2014The Importance of Religious Education
November 2, 2014Staying Connected
October 26, 2014Welcome, Father Hilbert!
October 19, 2014Mozart’s Great Mass
October 12, 2014The Sacrament of the Sick and the Joy of the Gospel
October 5, 2014Lay Ministry: Called to Serve
September 28, 2014The Wisdom Years
September 21, 2014A Childlike Faith
September 14, 2014The Cross: Innocence and Violence
September 7, 2014Summer Update 2014


ARCHIVED BULLETINS 2013-14
August 31, 2014Summer 2014
August 24, 2014Summer 2014
August 17, 2014Summer 2014
August 10, 2014Summer 2014
August 3, 2014Summer 2014
July 27, 2014Summer 2014
July 20, 2014Summer 2014
July 13, 2014Summer 2014
July 6, 2014Summer 2014
June 29, 2014Summer 2014
June 22, 2014Summer 2014
June 15, 2014From the Pastor: Parish Updates
June 8, 2014Rush of Wind, Tongues of Fire
June 1, 2014Stepping Aside But Still Working in the Vineyard
May 25, 2014A Golden Anniversary
May 18, 2014“It’s a Whole New Life!”
May 11, 2014Lay Ministers’ Enrichment
May 4, 2014Psalms of David
April 27, 2014Our Two Newest Saints
April 20, 2014He is Risen!
April 13, 2014The Cost of Discipleship
April 6, 2014I Am A Sinner
March 30, 2014The New Things of God, the Trials of Life, Remaining Steadfast in the Lord
March 23, 2014Only Say the Word
March 16, 2014Lenten Practice and Easter Preparation
March 9, 2014Celebrating This Sacred Season Together
March 2, 2014Pope Francis’ Message for Lent 2014
February 23, 2014The Art of the Family Mass
February 16, 2014Why Do Christians Love Sport?
February 9, 2014Who is Pope Francis?
February 2, 2014Feast of the Presentation of the Lord
January 26, 2014In Praise of Catholic Schools
January 19, 2014That They May Be One: The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity
January 12, 2014Human Trafficking/Modern Slavery
January 5, 2014World Day of Migrants and Refugees — A Message from Pope Francis
December 29, 2013He Dwells Among Us
December 22, 2013And On Earth, Peace
December 15, 2013Reconciliation: Celebration and Freedom
December 8, 2013The Gift of Deepened Faith
December 1, 2013What Sweeter Music
November 24, 2013Christ the Beginning and the End
November 17, 2013The Faith That Does Justice
November 10, 2013The Gift of Presence is Not So Simple
November 3, 2013Society of St. Vincent de Paul: Need, Not Creed
October 27, 2013Fall Bulletin
October 20, 2013World Mission, Our Mission
October 13, 2013Rachmaninoff’s All-Night Vigil
October 6, 2013Respect Life Sunday
September 29, 2013Building a Community of Disciples
September 22, 2013Liturgy of the Word for Children
September 15, 2013Welcome, Father Feely!
September 8, 2013Summer Update


ARCHIVED BULLETINS 2012-13
September 1, 2013Summer 2013
August 25, 2013Summer 2013
August 18, 2013Summer 2013
August 11, 2013Summer 2013
August 4, 2013Summer 2013
July 28, 2013Summer 2013
July 21, 2013Summer 2013
July 14, 2013Summer 2013
July 7, 2013Summer 2013
June 30, 2013Summer 2013
June 23, 2013Summer Sabbath: Rest, Receive, Renew
June 16, 2013A Father’s Love
June 9, 2013The Ignatian Way: Measured in Love
June 2, 2013Encountering the Mystery of Suffering
May 26, 2013Our Great God
May 19, 2013Renew the Face of the Earth!
May 12, 2013The Motherhood Community
May 5, 2013Notes From Our New Catholics
April 28, 2013Meet the Music Department, Part 2
April 21, 2013Final Vows
April 14, 2013Lay Ministers’ Enrichment
April 7, 2013IREP: Why We Teach
March 31, 2013Easter Mission
March 24, 2013The Pinnacle of the Church Year!
March 17, 2013Giants of Our Faith!
March 10, 2013I Promise You Joy!
March 3, 2013Caring for the Sick from an Ignatian Perspective
February 24, 2013Meet the Music Department
February 17, 2013Sheer Coincidence? My Journey with God
February 10, 2013Lenten Metanoia
February 3, 2013Faith Seeks Justice and Understanding
January 27, 2013The Ignatian Way: Our Pilgrimage Midpoint
January 20, 2013Entertaining Angels
January 13, 2013Baptism: Enlivening the Church
January 6, 2013Flight Into Egypt
December 30, 2012Welcoming the New Year
December 23 and 25, 2012God Is With Us
December 16, 2012Why Praise?
December 9, 2012The Advent Antidote
December 2, 2012Peace Through Christ
November 25, 2012Christ Our King
November 18, 201240s & Fabulous: Sharing Our Stories, Sharing Our Faith
November 11, 2012Fall Bulletin
November 4, 2012Rosary Rangers
October 28, 2012Society of St. Vincent de Paul
October 21, 2012Discerning in Troubled Times
October 14, 2012How BIG Can Your Life Be?
October 7, 2012Life is a Special Occasion!
September 30, 2012A Golden Anniversary
September 23, 2012The Recipe to Help Raise Substance-Free Children: Food, Family, and Fun
September 16, 2012The Ignatian Way
September 9, 2012Our Ignatian Heritage


ARCHIVED BULLETINS 2011-12
September 2, 2012Summer 2012
August 26, 2012Summer 2012
August 19, 2012Summer 2012
August 12, 2012Summer 2012
August 5, 2012Summer 2012
July 29, 2012Summer 2012
July 22, 2012Summer 2012
July 15, 2012Summer 2012
July 8, 2012Summer 2012
July 1, 2012Summer 2012
June 24, 2012Summer 2012
June 17, 2012Loving Jesus
June 10, 2012The Body and Blood of Christ
June 3, 2012The God of Mystery
May 27, 2012The Most Wonderful Gift in All the World
May 20, 2012The Search for the Director of Music Ministries
May 13, 2012Notes from Our New Catholics
May 6, 2012The Voice of St. Ignatius
April 29, 2012Here I Am, Lord; I Come to Do Your Will
April 22, 2012Confirmandi: In Service of Others
April 15, 2012Easter Memorial Liturgy
April 8, 2012Christ is Risen!
April 1, 2012Holy Week
March 25, 2012Conceived and Born to Die
March 18, 2012The Transcendence and Immanence of God
March 11, 2012The Parish Staff
March 4, 2012The Healing Touch of Christ for the Sick
February 26, 2012Metanoia: A Movement of the Heart
February 19, 2012The Healing Touch of Christ
February 12, 2012Love and Marriage
February 5, 2012World Day of the Sick
January 29, 2012Saint Ignatius Loyola School: A Blue Ribbon School
January 22, 2012Habitat for Humanity
January 15, 2012May They Be One: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity
January 8, 2012Epiphany and Revelation and Wonder
January 1, 2012Educating Young People in Justice and Peace
December 25, 2011Gazing into the Manger
December 18, 2011Christmas: God, Generosity, and Gratitude
December 11, 2011Advent: A Period of Divine Waiting
December 4, 2011An Advent Journey for All of Us
November 27, 2011What Good Liturgy is All About
November 20, 2011The Revised English Translation of the Roman Missal: Memorial Acclamation and Agnus Dei
November 13, 2011Giving Thanks
November 6, 2011The Revised English Translation of the Roman Missal: The Creed and Sanctus
October 30, 2011The Revised English Translation of the Roman Missal: Penitential Act, Gloria, and Gospel
October 23, 2011One Bread, One Body
October 16, 2011Fall Bulletin
October 9, 2011The Revised English Translation of the Roman Missal: The Greeting and Dismissal
October 2, 2011The New Text for Mass
September 25, 2011Here I am, Lord!
September 11, 2011A Time of Darkness and Light
September 4, 2011Summer 2011


ARCHIVED BULLETINS 2010-11
August 28, 2011Summer 2011
August 21, 2011Summer 2011
August 14, 2011Summer 2011
August 7, 2011Summer 2011
July 31, 2011Summer 2011
July 24, 2011Summer 2011
July 17, 2011Kent Tritle: A Fond Farewell
July 10, 2011Summer 2011
July 3, 2011Summer 2011
June 26, 2011Corpus Christi
June 19, 2011Tertianship: A School of the Heart
June 12, 2011Pentecost
June 5, 2011Saint Ignatius Loyol School
May 29, 2011Pronouncing Final Vows
May 22, 2011A Church to Call Home
May 15, 2011Vocations: The Harvest is Abundant, but the Laborers are Few
May 8, 2011A Christian Response to the Death of Osama bin Laden
May 1, 2011God’s Mercy and Redemption
April 24, 2011The Gift of New Life
April 17, 2011Journeying with Mary
April 10, 2011A Time to Reconcile
April 3, 2011Joy in the Midst of Sorrow
March 27, 2011Speaking to God Through Music
March 20, 2011Lament, Repent, and Re-Imagine!
March 13, 2011Roman Catholics in Progress: Our Journey Has Only Begun
March 6, 2011Lent: Turning Time
February 27, 2011The Lenten Cross
February 20, 2011Meeting Christ in Prayer
February 13, 2011You’ve Got to Have Heart
February 6, 2011Music to Lift the Soul
January 30, 2011A Feast Week for Schools
January 23, 2011Trafficking: The New Slavery
January 16, 2011That They May Be One: The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity
January 9, 2011Infant Baptism: What Does It Mean?
January 2, 2011Epiphany
December 25, 2010God is With Us
December 19, 2010The Christian’s Advent Journey
December 12, 2010The Beauty of Sacred Music
December 5, 2010Welcome Home!
November 28, 2010Advent: Season of Expectations
November 21, 2010Finding God in the Gift of Prayer
November 14, 2010The Burning Bush
November 7, 2010All the Saints
October 31, 2010The Society of St. Vincent de Paul
October 24, 2010Proclaim the Good News!
October 17, 2010Church of St. Ignatius Loyola: Operating Revenue and Expense Report, 2009-2010
October 10, 2010Time, Talent, and Treasure
October 3, 2010From “Extreme Unction” to “Sacrament of the Sick”
September 26, 2010Family Day 2010
September 19, 2010Happy 100th Birthday St. Ignatius Loyola Day Nursery!
September 12, 2010A Busy Summer, A Busy Fall at St. Ignatius
September 5, 2010September 5, Summer 2010


ARCHIVED BULLETINS 2009-10
August 29, 2010August 29, Summer 2010
August 22, 2010August 22, Summer 2010
August 15, 2010August 15, Summer 2010
August 8, 2010August 8, Summer 2010
August 1, 2010August 1, Summer 2010
July 25, 2010July 25, Summer 2010
July 18, 2010July 18, Summer 2010
July 11, 2010July 11, Summer 2010
July 4, 2010July 4, Summer 2010
June 27, 2010The Sabbath of Summer
June 20, 2010A Father Who Runs to Us
June 13, 2010Our School Experience
June 6, 2010“Do This in Memory of Me”
May 30, 2010An Everyday Sacrament
May 23, 2010Pentecost: The Gift of the Spirit
May 16, 2010A Spirit of Service and Love
May 9, 2010Centering Prayer
May 2, 2010Notes from Our New Catholics
April 25, 2010Sing to the Lord

Pastoral Care to the Sick and Homebound

Ministry of Care to the Sick and Homebound
St. Ignatius Loyola Parish

The face of each person who suffers is a face of Christ. One of the deepest causes of suffering experienced by those whom sickness or aging afflicts is a sense of isolation from the faith community. Because we are members of the Body of Christ, it is Christ who is present to us in our suffering, particularly through our Ministers of Care. 

The Ministers of Care of St. Ignatius Loyola Parish are a sign of the community’s presence, bringing the Sacraments of Eucharist, Reconciliation, and Anointing of the Sick, as well as comfort, presence, and prayer to members who are unable to participate because of illness or aging.

Ministers of Care include laity and the ordained. Laity who are Ministers of Care are trained as Extraordinary Ministers of the Eucharist and Pastoral Visitors. Ministers of Care are living witnesses that the community of faith has not forgotten the absent sick, the invisible elderly, and the unseen sufferers. Their presence draws them into conscious communion with the whole Body of Christ so that they may experience that as “a community of disciples” no one is alone.

St. Ignatius Loyola Ministry to the Sick and Homebound includes:
• Outreach to Lott Residence, DeWitt Nursing Home, and Lenox Hill Hospital
• Pastoral Visiting to Homes
• Liturgy of the Anointing of the Sick
• Prayer Shawl Ministry


Liturgy of the Anointing of the Sick

The Parish provides two opportunities during the year for those who are ill or elderly to receive the healing strength of the Sacrament of the Sick as a community. These liturgies are designed so that the community can support those members who face the suffering of illness or aging. 

All those who are chronically or acutely ill or who are aging are invited to participate. 
All parishioners are invited to attend.


Prayer Shawl Ministry

Compassion and the love of knitting or crocheting are combined into a prayerful ministry and spiritual practice which reaches out to those in need of comfort. This ministry was founded in 1998 by Janet Bristow and Victoria Galo, graduates of the 1997 Women’s Leadership Institute at The Hartford Seminary in Connecticut. It was the result of their experience in the program of applied Feminist Spirituality under the direction of Professor Miriam Therese Winter, MMS. 

The ministry is open to anyone who enjoys knitting or crocheting, who is willing to pray for the recipient throughout the creation of the shawl, and who is willing to donate the shawl to the ill, particularly at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. 

For further information on the prayer shawl ministry, visit http://www.shawlministry.com

The Mander Organ

Mander Pipe OrganThe magnificent pipe organ at St. Ignatius Loyola has become an organ of choice for recitals and recordings, as predicted by historian Barbara Owen in The New York Times in 1993. It may be heard on a dozen CD recordings that feature world renowned ensembles, such as the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and the Westminster Choir, and solo performances by artists including John Scott, Kent Tritle, David Liddle and with instrumentalists including the New York Philharmonic’s Thomas Stacy. The organ has proven itself time and again as a versatile and artistically superb instrument. As the largest tracker-action pipe organ in the New York Metropolitan area, it holds special appeal for organists and lovers of organ music. The organist of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, Olivier Latry, personally chose the organ and church as the American site for his acclaimed cycles of Messiaen’s complete organ works in 2000, along with Notre Dame and St. Paul’s Cathedral in London.

The organ’s debut on April 27, 1993 coincided with an article by The New York Times writer Glenn Collins, who had spent the previous 6 months following the construction of the 5,000 pipe, 30 ton, 45 foot high instrument. Resulting enthusiasm and interest from ABC, CNN, NPR, CBC and a host of other important media culminated in a pre-recital press conference with the builder, John Mander, the pastor of the church, Fr. Walter Modrys, S.J. and recitalist David Higgs. The concert itself was an historic event, packing nearly 1,800 people (some police estimates were 2,000) into a church that can seat 1,200 at Easter!

The firm N.P. Mander was selected in 1991 to build the new instrument for St. Ignatius Loyola. This would be the largest tracker organ ever to have been built in the British Isles. Other instruments by the Mander firm include those at St. Paul’s Cathedral (London); St. John’s College, Cambridge; Princeton University, and important instruments in Japan (6), Africa (9), Oman (4), and Norway.

The Church of St. Ignatius Loyola is renowned for its acoustics, as Barbara Owen had noted in that initial New York Times story. “The acoustic is awfully good. One of the most important stops on the organ is the room. This is why people sing in the shower and not in the bedroom.” Lincoln Center has presented many concerts at St. Ignatius Loyola by artists including Yo Yo Ma, Dawn Upshaw, Ton Koopman, The Kirov Opera Chorus, Les Arts Florissants, and a host of other international performers. The combination of this splendid acoustic and the N.P. Mander instrument is in great part what makes the organ at St. Ignatius Loyola so special.

The organ is featured in numerous recitals each year, and also takes its place in the church’s “Sacred Music in a Sacred Space” concert series, founded in March of 1990. From Saint-Saens’ “Organ Symphony” to concerti by Rheinberger, Poulenc and Handel, the organ is truly the crown jewel of this acclaimed series of professionally produced choral and orchestral concerts. Most importantly, the organ provides this growing congregation with musical support for prayer at liturgy. It may be heard in worship at the Sunday 11 a.m. Solemn Mass along with the acclaimed Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola. The Mander organ is also played for the Saturday 5:30 p.m. and Sunday 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. liturgies. At the Sunday evening liturgy the organ combines with piano and choral ensemble to support a musical aesthetic which combines old and new musical traditions. As the parish’s many ministries continue to grow and flourish, the organ contributes to the worship of children and young people from St. Ignatius Loyola Grammar School, the Interparish Religious Education Program and many area high schools.

The Church of St. Ignatius Loyola was founded in 1851 and entrusted to the Jesuits in 1866. In 1898 the present edifice was built, housing a Hook & Hastings pipe organ. That instrument fell into disrepair and was replaced by an electronic organ in the 1970’s. When the electronic instrument deteriorated, an anonymous benefactor and the Paul Montrone family joined to make it possible for this magnificent pipe organ to once again fill the church with sounds of worship and praise. Above the organ console is carved the Jesuit motto “A.M.D.G.” - ad majorem Dei gloriam - “to the greater glory of God”. Through liturgy and concert this magnificent instrument will inspire hope, consolation and joy for generations to come!

For further information about the Mander Pipe Organ visit the American Guild of Organists webpage for Church of St. Ignatius Loyola.

 

News & Announcements

Of Interest

Now Available: Our Stories: Being LGBT and Catholic
In November, our LGBT Catholics & Friends ministry hosted the event “Our Stories: Being LGBT and Catholic”, which focused on 6 members of the ministry sharing their personal accounts of reconciling their faith with their identity.

Now, those stories have been compiled into a booklet that brings their experiences into full color.

Click below to read their stories. Hard copies of the booklet are also available in our Narthex.

 

 


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World Refugee Day: 4 Words to Open the World
Pope Francis has urged the global community to adopt a shared response to the global refugee situation that may be articulated in four words: welcome, protect, promote and integrate.

On this World Refugee Day, the Jesuit Refugee Service and Entreculturas are building upon Pope Francis’s words to advocate for refugee education with the campaign 4 Words to Open the World.

 

 

 

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2018-2019 IREP Registration
Registration for the 2018-2019 session of the Interparish Religious Education Program is now open! Click here to register.

Please note: Online registration for the 2018-2019 session of the Interparish Religious Education Program closes on Tuesday, September 4th at 4:00 PM. However, as space is limited, early registration is recommended.

 


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St. Ignatius in the News
Currents News spoke with our pastor Fr. Yesalonia, along with the sculptors from Figuration Studio, about the statue of Pope Francis that is currently in residence in our Narthex and on its inspiration, Laudato Si’, the papal encyclical on the environment.

 

 

 

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Your Parish, Your Home:
Campaign for the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola


At the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, we warmly welcome those who seek to be a part of a vibrant worshipping community.

For more than 150 years as a Jesuit parish, we have followed the Ignatian Way of prayer, community, and service. We are always open to where God is calling us.

But our magnificent church buildings don’t reflect the welcome we extend to everyone.

You can help change that by making a gift to this important capital campaign.

Through the work we are eager to accomplish, we will continue to grow our parish, build our community, and fulfill our mission.

To learn more about the Your Parish, Your Home Capital Campaign, click here.

 

 


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FORMED: The Catholic Faith On Demand
Discover all the best Catholic content in one place. Entertaining movies, enlightening programs, inspiring talks, and a great selection of popular ebooks. It is available anywhere, anytime, on computers, tablets, and phones.

How to sign-up for your one-year subscription:
1. Visit http://www.formed.org

2. Then, click on the button marked Enter Code, which is located at the top left-hand of the page, and then enter our code JM4KZX (all uppercase letters).

3. Start navigating! For subsequent visits, log-in by going directly to formed.org and entering your user name/email and password.

 

 


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Church of St. Ignatius Loyola is now on Facebook!
Find us on Facebook to stay up-to-date on upcoming events and programs here at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola.

Visit us at
https://www.facebook.com/churchofstignatiusloyolanyc/

Upcoming Events
at St. Ignatius

Mon., Jun. 25, 10:00 am
Moms, Pops & Tots

Wed., Jun. 27, 7:00 pm
SVdP Meeting
All are welcome!

Mon., Jul. 02, 10:00 am
Moms, Pops & Tots
New start time!o

Wed., Jul. 11, 7:00 pm
SVdP Meeting
All are welcome!

Thu., Jul. 19, 6:30 pm
Ignatian Social Justice
All are welcome.

Wed., Jul. 25, 7:00 pm
SVdP Meeting
All are welcome!

Thu., Aug. 16, 6:30 pm
Ignatian Social Justice
All are welcome.

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